Passive Case Witnessing Problem

It’s a case of a 6 year old girl who consulted me on 18/12/08.

The very first peculiar thing we observe about the child is …she enters the consulting room holding mothers hand tightly.

M: She has made a drawing for you.

(Child’s sibling is also our patient. Every time when this child used to accompany her sister, she would draw and now also she has got the following drawings. This itself shows us the child’s intense connection with her subconscious through this form of art.)

M: She does not have any health problem as such but I wanted to start treatment for her overall development.

PASSIVE CASE WITNESSING PROCESS

D:        Tell me what’s happening to you..? Can I send your mother out?

P: No.

OBSERVATION: Clings tightly to her mother.

D:        Okay, tell me what’s your name?

P: OBSERVATION: Sitting in mothers lap with her hands around mother’s neck. N……P……

D:        Tell me more about you?

P: PAUSE

OBSERVATION: Smiles and clings more to the mother.

D:        Tell me what are your interest and hobbies? What you like to do?

P: I like to swim, like to draw, I like running…playing.

D:        Wow! What else?

P: I like to play on the computer, like to watch TV.

OBSERVATION: Now she removes her hand from the mother’s neck and sits leaning on the table, yet she is in her mothers lap.

D:        What else you like to do?

P: Like to go to school.

D:        Very nice, very nice you are talking?

M: You sit on the chair and talk to the doctor.

P: OBSERVATION; child sits on a chair next to the mother but still holding her arm.

As the mother starts to leave the room, the child jumps off the chair, starts crying and goes and hugs the mother, and goes out with her.)

(The mother comes in with her after some time but now the child sits on the chair and mother on the sofa behind her.)

D:        OK, so tell me what else you like to do?

P: I’ll like to play – go on a slide. Like to read books.

D:        Very nice. You are speaking so well. What else you like to do?

P: Like to dance… then I like to play, then I do homework.

OBSERVATION: Looks behind towards the  mother.

ACTIVE CASE WITNESSING PROCESS

D:        And what are you scared of?

P: Scared of lions, tigers…

D:        What else?

P: Bhoot.

The mother had some work and she had to go out of the room. Immediately the child said no.

D:        You are speaking so well. Just talk with me and your mother will come in 2 minutes.

P: No…no…(OBSERVATION: She gets up and clings to mother and starts crying)

D:        OK you don’t talk, but can you draw till your mom comes back?

(She sits on the chair and starts drawing.)

(Since she was not ready to communicate even after so much of encouragement and the fact that at the beginning she had brought drawings, we ask her to draw.)

OBSERVATION: She covers the paper with the hand and also draws at one lower section of the page.)

D:        Wow! What is this?

P: This is my sister & me, & this is my father and my brother.

D:        And what is this?

P: A heart.

ACTIVE – ACTIVE CASE WITNESSING PROCESS…

D:        What is this heart doing here?

P: I love heart so I drew it.

D:        Earlier also you drew hearts. What about this heart you love?

P: I love heart like that only.

D:        Heart with arrows what does this mean?

P: Looking into the drawing. (PAUSE)

D:        What are you all doing?

P: We all are looking at the heart and thinking what is it.

D:        What does the heart mean?

P: I don’t know.

D:        You like drawing heart huh. When do you draw it?

P: In school. In my drawing class. I draw heart and stars and one day I drew heart and star in the Christmas tree.

D:        In this drawing who is having the flower? (We spotted a flower in the drawing she had made.)

P: My sister- she is just holding it.

D:        She is going to give it to someone or what?

P: Me.

D:        And heart will go to whom.

P: To my brother and father.

D:        Why?

P: Like that only.

D:        Like that only. OK… Would you like to draw something more for me?

D:        Wow! What is this?

P: A drawing.

D:        Of what?

P: Drawing of a garden. This is me and my brother.

D:        What are you both doing here?

P: We have come here to play.

D:        What are you playing?

P: Running and catching.

D:        What is this?

P: Flowers.

D:        Which flower are they?

P: This is flower, this rose and…this …this is pink flower.

D:        Draw one more thing for me?

P: OBSERVATION:  She draws human figures and then joins all of them together.

D:        Wow! What is this? I don’t know what it is.

P: My family.

D:        What’s your family doing here?

P: Ring-a-ring-a-roses.

D:        Ring-a-ring-a-roses. What’s that?

P: I don’t know.

D:        Whom you like the most in your family?

P: My mom.

D:        What about mom you like the most.

P: (PAUSE)

D:        You like or your sister likes?

P: I like more.

D:        What else?

P: (PAUSE)

ACTIVE – ACTIVE IN DIFFERENT AREA – FEAR

D:        What are you scared the most.

P: Lion and tiger.

D:        What about them scares you the most?

P: Because lion crawls and eat us.

D:        What else do they do.

P: Smiles.

D:        You said previously that you are also scared of ghost. What about them scares you?

P: (PAUSE) … I saw the movie called Road side Romeo. (This is a bollywood movie)

(Here when we ask her about fears, she herself goes to the area of movies, so we become active- active to explore this area.)

ACTIVE – ACTIVE IN DIFFERENT AREA -MOVIES

D:        What is there in that movie?

P: There’s a dog, many dogs but 1 dog’s name is Romeo.

D:        Go on?

P: There is a girl called Leila and she loved…. and that dog he loved Leila..

D:        I don’t know what they do? Love means what?

P: I don’t know.

D:        What about the movie do you like the most?

P: I like Leila.

D:        What about Leila you like?

P: (PAUSE)

OBSERVATION: leans on the table and hides mouth behind both palms.

D:        Which other movies you like?

P: Romeo & Jaane tu… (It’s a Bollywood romantic movie.)

D:        And what is there in that movie Jaane tu…?

P: I forget.

D:        Anything else about you.

P: Nods no.

D:        So you like all movies with love/

P: Nods Yes.

D:        What about it you like?

P: I don’t know… because nice things happen.

D:        What?

P: Like they don’t shout, they don’t hit and all.

D:        Anything else.

P: No.

Child goes out and comes back with another drawing along with the mother.

MOTHER’S OBSERVATION OF THE CHILD

She is very affectionate child.  She will go and give big hugs even to strangers. She is very fond of her younger brother and she will make him understand things by saying you can win this or that and she lets him win. Actually she is friendly with anybody and everybody.

END OF THE CASE

—————————————————

UNDERSTANDING OF THE CASE

OU OF PLACE/ OUT OF ORDER

Passive case witnessing process

Verbally the child didn’t speak anything peculiar but our observations regarding the child were very peculiar…

• Her clinging.
• Sitting in the mother’s lap.
• Holding mother tightly.
• Holding her hand while talking.
• Hugging the mother.

Active case witnessing process

• Clings to mother as she tries to go out of the room.
• Covering the paper with hand while drawing.
• A heart.

Active-Active case witnessing process

• I love heart .
• I drew heart and star in the Christmas tree.
• Drawing of a garden
• Flowers.
• Draws human figures and then joins all of them together.
• Too much family attachment.
• Ring-a-ring-a-roses.
• That dog he loved Laila Leila
• Like they don’t shout, they don’t hit and all.

WHAT IS THE FOCUS/CENTRE/ESSENCE OF THE CASE

• Love, attachment and togetherness.
• Love for heart.

This is very evident from her body language and all her drawings. Also this further gets confirmed from the mother’s observation of the child.

WHICH KINGDOM?

• Pure sensitivity seen.
• Drawings of garden, flowers.

This clearly points to the PLANT KINGDOM.

WHICH FAMILY?

This tremendous attachment to the mother, togetherness of the family, hugging and clinginess, love for hearts is very suggestive of the MALVALES family.

WHICH MIASM?

We observed that whenever she draws she covers the paper with her hand. This gives a hint of the SYCOTIC MIASM.

WHICH REMEDY?

The remedy from the Malvales family with Sycotic miasm running in the centre is TILIA EUROPA. BUT in the case we observed that along with the general theme of the Malvales family, the child’s focus was “Heart”. So when a further inquisitive search was made keeping focus on the “Heart” interestingly we found out a remedy TILIA CORDATA which also belongs to the same family where the leaves of the tree are heart shaped.
Thus the remedy given was TILIA CORDATA.

WHICH POTENCY?

At the end of Passive case witnessing process, verbally the child seemed to be at the ‘Name and Fact’ level but the peculiar body language which we didn’t understand initially and which got connected later on with the whole phenomenon, represented the child’s complete altered energy pattern. Thus the child (non-verbally) vibrated at the Delusion level. Therefore the potency given was 1M, single dose.

A follow up drawing

END OF THE CASE

Constantine Hering (1800 – 1880)



Hpathy Ezine, October, 2009 | Print This Post |

Constantine Hering (1800 – 1880)

Dr. Constantine Hering is aptly called the ‘Father of Homeopathy’ in America. He was born at Oschath in Saxony on January 1, 1800. At the age of seventeen, he became interested in medicine and joined the University of Leipzig, where he became the favourite pupil of Dr. Henrich Robbi, an eminent surgeon. Dr. Robbi was a critic of Hahnemann and like many other physicians used to ridicule Hahnemann and Homeopathy.

In 1821, campaign against Hahnemann was at its peak, C. Baumgartner, the founder of a publishing house in Leipzig, wanted to publish a book against Homeopathy to finish the system. Dr. Robbi was asked to write it, but he declined for want of time and recommended Hering, his young assistant. Hering was very pleased with this mark of confidence and started work on the project.. But while going through the writings of Hahnemann he came across the famous “Not a bene for my reviewers” in the preface of the third volume of the ‘Materia Medica Pura’ which said among other things, “The doctrine appeals not only chiefly, but solely to the verdict of experience” – “repeat the experiments” it cries aloud, “repeat them carefully and accurately and you will find the doctrine confirmed at every step” – “and it does what no medical doctrine, no system of physics, no so-called therapeutics did or could do, it insists upon being judged by the result.”

Hering decided to confirm the truth of the above remarks. He repeated the experiments with Cinchona and the results of Hahnemann were confirmed. Further study of homeopathic ‘Materia Medica’ and his experiments made him more convinced about Hahnemann’s ideas. The book against Homeopathy thus never saw the light of the day.

In 1824, an incident occurred which developed in him unshakable faith for Homeopathy. The fore finger of his right hand was cut while making a dissection on a dead body. The wound rapidly became gangrenous. The routine orthodox medical treatment had no effect. Kummer, a deciple of Hahnemann persuaded him to take homeopathic treatment and gave him Arsenic-alb. After a few doses he felt better and the gangrene was soon cured completely. Hering was surprised and became greatly interested in Homeopathy,

Hering got the degree of M. D. from the University of Wuezburg with highest honours. The theme of his thesis was “De’Medicina Futura” (The medicine of future). Hering left Germany for West Indies and finally arrived at Philadelphia in Jan, 1833. He established a homeopathic school at Allentown, Pennsylvania, commonly known as “Allentown Academy”. Soon he became very popular as a physician.

Contributions:

  1. Domestic physician
  2. Guiding Symptoms, a monumental work of 10 volumes.
  3. He wrote many articles, monographs, and books. He was the chief editor of the ‘North America Homeopathic Journal’, ‘The Homeopathic News’, ‘The American Journal of Homeopathic Materia Medica’ and the journal of his own college.
  4. He proved 72 drugs, out of which the following are most important ones: Lachesis, Cantharis, Colchicum, Iodium, Mezereum, Sabadilla, Sabina, Psorinum, Nux-mosch, Crotalus, Apis, Hydrophobinum, Phytolacca, Platina, Glonine, Gelsemium, Kalmia, Ferrum met, Flouric acid, Phosphoric acid etc.
  5. He enunciated the “Law of Direction of Cure” known popularly as Hering’s Law of Cure.

Hpathy

This article and all other content at Hpathy.com is copyright protected by Hpathy.com. Any unauthorized copying to other websites or journals is not permitted. See the full Copyright Notice and Disclaimer at Hpathy.com

Add a comment

Register and Login to avoid filling the form below everytime you post a comment. Registered members also see less ads, can participate in forum discussions and have better site speed. Registration is Free!