Passive Case Witnessing Problem

It’s a case of a 6 year old girl who consulted me on 18/12/08.

The very first peculiar thing we observe about the child is …she enters the consulting room holding mothers hand tightly.

M: She has made a drawing for you.

(Child’s sibling is also our patient. Every time when this child used to accompany her sister, she would draw and now also she has got the following drawings. This itself shows us the child’s intense connection with her subconscious through this form of art.)

M: She does not have any health problem as such but I wanted to start treatment for her overall development.

PASSIVE CASE WITNESSING PROCESS

D:        Tell me what’s happening to you..? Can I send your mother out?

P: No.

OBSERVATION: Clings tightly to her mother.

D:        Okay, tell me what’s your name?

P: OBSERVATION: Sitting in mothers lap with her hands around mother’s neck. N……P……

D:        Tell me more about you?

P: PAUSE

OBSERVATION: Smiles and clings more to the mother.

D:        Tell me what are your interest and hobbies? What you like to do?

P: I like to swim, like to draw, I like running…playing.

D:        Wow! What else?

P: I like to play on the computer, like to watch TV.

OBSERVATION: Now she removes her hand from the mother’s neck and sits leaning on the table, yet she is in her mothers lap.

D:        What else you like to do?

P: Like to go to school.

D:        Very nice, very nice you are talking?

M: You sit on the chair and talk to the doctor.

P: OBSERVATION; child sits on a chair next to the mother but still holding her arm.

As the mother starts to leave the room, the child jumps off the chair, starts crying and goes and hugs the mother, and goes out with her.)

(The mother comes in with her after some time but now the child sits on the chair and mother on the sofa behind her.)

D:        OK, so tell me what else you like to do?

P: I’ll like to play – go on a slide. Like to read books.

D:        Very nice. You are speaking so well. What else you like to do?

P: Like to dance… then I like to play, then I do homework.

OBSERVATION: Looks behind towards the  mother.

ACTIVE CASE WITNESSING PROCESS

D:        And what are you scared of?

P: Scared of lions, tigers…

D:        What else?

P: Bhoot.

The mother had some work and she had to go out of the room. Immediately the child said no.

D:        You are speaking so well. Just talk with me and your mother will come in 2 minutes.

P: No…no…(OBSERVATION: She gets up and clings to mother and starts crying)

D:        OK you don’t talk, but can you draw till your mom comes back?

(She sits on the chair and starts drawing.)

(Since she was not ready to communicate even after so much of encouragement and the fact that at the beginning she had brought drawings, we ask her to draw.)

OBSERVATION: She covers the paper with the hand and also draws at one lower section of the page.)

D:        Wow! What is this?

P: This is my sister & me, & this is my father and my brother.

D:        And what is this?

P: A heart.

ACTIVE – ACTIVE CASE WITNESSING PROCESS…

D:        What is this heart doing here?

P: I love heart so I drew it.

D:        Earlier also you drew hearts. What about this heart you love?

P: I love heart like that only.

D:        Heart with arrows what does this mean?

P: Looking into the drawing. (PAUSE)

D:        What are you all doing?

P: We all are looking at the heart and thinking what is it.

D:        What does the heart mean?

P: I don’t know.

D:        You like drawing heart huh. When do you draw it?

P: In school. In my drawing class. I draw heart and stars and one day I drew heart and star in the Christmas tree.

D:        In this drawing who is having the flower? (We spotted a flower in the drawing she had made.)

P: My sister- she is just holding it.

D:        She is going to give it to someone or what?

P: Me.

D:        And heart will go to whom.

P: To my brother and father.

D:        Why?

P: Like that only.

D:        Like that only. OK… Would you like to draw something more for me?

D:        Wow! What is this?

P: A drawing.

D:        Of what?

P: Drawing of a garden. This is me and my brother.

D:        What are you both doing here?

P: We have come here to play.

D:        What are you playing?

P: Running and catching.

D:        What is this?

P: Flowers.

D:        Which flower are they?

P: This is flower, this rose and…this …this is pink flower.

D:        Draw one more thing for me?

P: OBSERVATION:  She draws human figures and then joins all of them together.

D:        Wow! What is this? I don’t know what it is.

P: My family.

D:        What’s your family doing here?

P: Ring-a-ring-a-roses.

D:        Ring-a-ring-a-roses. What’s that?

P: I don’t know.

D:        Whom you like the most in your family?

P: My mom.

D:        What about mom you like the most.

P: (PAUSE)

D:        You like or your sister likes?

P: I like more.

D:        What else?

P: (PAUSE)

ACTIVE – ACTIVE IN DIFFERENT AREA – FEAR

D:        What are you scared the most.

P: Lion and tiger.

D:        What about them scares you the most?

P: Because lion crawls and eat us.

D:        What else do they do.

P: Smiles.

D:        You said previously that you are also scared of ghost. What about them scares you?

P: (PAUSE) … I saw the movie called Road side Romeo. (This is a bollywood movie)

(Here when we ask her about fears, she herself goes to the area of movies, so we become active- active to explore this area.)

ACTIVE – ACTIVE IN DIFFERENT AREA -MOVIES

D:        What is there in that movie?

P: There’s a dog, many dogs but 1 dog’s name is Romeo.

D:        Go on?

P: There is a girl called Leila and she loved…. and that dog he loved Leila..

D:        I don’t know what they do? Love means what?

P: I don’t know.

D:        What about the movie do you like the most?

P: I like Leila.

D:        What about Leila you like?

P: (PAUSE)

OBSERVATION: leans on the table and hides mouth behind both palms.

D:        Which other movies you like?

P: Romeo & Jaane tu… (It’s a Bollywood romantic movie.)

D:        And what is there in that movie Jaane tu…?

P: I forget.

D:        Anything else about you.

P: Nods no.

D:        So you like all movies with love/

P: Nods Yes.

D:        What about it you like?

P: I don’t know… because nice things happen.

D:        What?

P: Like they don’t shout, they don’t hit and all.

D:        Anything else.

P: No.

Child goes out and comes back with another drawing along with the mother.

MOTHER’S OBSERVATION OF THE CHILD

She is very affectionate child.  She will go and give big hugs even to strangers. She is very fond of her younger brother and she will make him understand things by saying you can win this or that and she lets him win. Actually she is friendly with anybody and everybody.

END OF THE CASE

—————————————————

UNDERSTANDING OF THE CASE

OU OF PLACE/ OUT OF ORDER

Passive case witnessing process

Verbally the child didn’t speak anything peculiar but our observations regarding the child were very peculiar…

• Her clinging.
• Sitting in the mother’s lap.
• Holding mother tightly.
• Holding her hand while talking.
• Hugging the mother.

Active case witnessing process

• Clings to mother as she tries to go out of the room.
• Covering the paper with hand while drawing.
• A heart.

Active-Active case witnessing process

• I love heart .
• I drew heart and star in the Christmas tree.
• Drawing of a garden
• Flowers.
• Draws human figures and then joins all of them together.
• Too much family attachment.
• Ring-a-ring-a-roses.
• That dog he loved Laila Leila
• Like they don’t shout, they don’t hit and all.

WHAT IS THE FOCUS/CENTRE/ESSENCE OF THE CASE

• Love, attachment and togetherness.
• Love for heart.

This is very evident from her body language and all her drawings. Also this further gets confirmed from the mother’s observation of the child.

WHICH KINGDOM?

• Pure sensitivity seen.
• Drawings of garden, flowers.

This clearly points to the PLANT KINGDOM.

WHICH FAMILY?

This tremendous attachment to the mother, togetherness of the family, hugging and clinginess, love for hearts is very suggestive of the MALVALES family.

WHICH MIASM?

We observed that whenever she draws she covers the paper with her hand. This gives a hint of the SYCOTIC MIASM.

WHICH REMEDY?

The remedy from the Malvales family with Sycotic miasm running in the centre is TILIA EUROPA. BUT in the case we observed that along with the general theme of the Malvales family, the child’s focus was “Heart”. So when a further inquisitive search was made keeping focus on the “Heart” interestingly we found out a remedy TILIA CORDATA which also belongs to the same family where the leaves of the tree are heart shaped.
Thus the remedy given was TILIA CORDATA.

WHICH POTENCY?

At the end of Passive case witnessing process, verbally the child seemed to be at the ‘Name and Fact’ level but the peculiar body language which we didn’t understand initially and which got connected later on with the whole phenomenon, represented the child’s complete altered energy pattern. Thus the child (non-verbally) vibrated at the Delusion level. Therefore the potency given was 1M, single dose.

A follow up drawing

END OF THE CASE

COPD



Hpathy Ezine, May, 2011 | Print This Post |

COPD Introduction Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by chronic airflow limitation that is not fully reversible and an abnormal inflammatory response in the lungs. The latter represent the innate and adaptive immune responses to a lifetime of exposure to noxious particles, fumes and gases, particularly cigarette smoke. All cigarette smokers have inflammatory changes within their lungs, but those who develop COPD exhibit an enhanced or abnormal inflammatory response may result in mucous hyper-secretion (chronic bronchitis), tissue destruction (emphysema), disruption of normal repair and defense mechanism causing small airway inflammation (bronchiolitis) and fibrosis. These pathological changes result in increased resistance to airflow in the small conducting airways and increased compliance and reduced elastic recoil of the lungs. This causes progressive airflow limitation and air trapping, which are the hallmark features of COPD. There is increasing understanding of the cell and the molecular mechanism that result in the pathological changes found and how these lead to physiological abnormalities and subsequent development of symptoms. What are the causes of a COPD exacerbation? These are two very common causes of COPD exacerbation: Lung infections, such as bronchitis and pneumonia. Infections are the most common cause of COPD exacerbations and are usually caused by a virus, but they can also be caused by bacteria. Lung irritation from dust, fumes, and other sources of air pollution. When you experience a COPD exacerbation, there is a dramatic increase in mucus production in your lungs as well as narrowing of the airways of the lungs a […]

COPD

Introduction

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by chronic airflow limitation that is not fully reversible and an abnormal inflammatory response in the lungs. The latter represent the innate and adaptive immune responses to a lifetime of exposure to noxious particles, fumes and gases, particularly cigarette smoke. All cigarette smokers have inflammatory changes within their lungs, but those who develop COPD exhibit an enhanced or abnormal inflammatory response may result in mucous hyper-secretion (chronic bronchitis), tissue destruction (emphysema), disruption of normal repair and defense mechanism causing small airway inflammation (bronchiolitis) and fibrosis.

These pathological changes result in increased resistance to airflow in the small conducting airways and increased compliance and reduced elastic recoil of the lungs. This causes progressive airflow limitation and air trapping, which are the hallmark features of COPD. There is increasing understanding of the cell and the molecular mechanism that result in the pathological changes found and how these lead to physiological abnormalities and subsequent development of symptoms.

What are the causes of a COPD exacerbation?

These are two very common causes of COPD exacerbation:

  • Lung infections, such as bronchitis and pneumonia. Infections are the most common cause of COPD exacerbations and are usually caused by a virus, but they can also be caused by bacteria.
  • Lung irritation from dust, fumes, and other sources of air pollution.

When you experience a COPD exacerbation, there is a dramatic increase in mucus production in your lungs as well as narrowing of the airways of the lungs a (bronchial tubes). The increased mucus production and airway narrowing decrease the air flow in the lungs, worsening the symptoms of cough and shortness of breath.

Other cases of COPD exacerbations include heart failure, allergic reactions, accidental inhalation of food or stomach contents into the lungs, and exposure to temperature changes or chemicals. In about one third of COPD exacerbations, doctors cannot find a cause.

Symptoms of COPD

The most common symptoms seen in COPD are breathlessness, cough and fatigue. There is no good correlation between lung function and symptoms of COPD, not even the standardized scoring of breathlessness correlates well with FEV; the important message being that a simple physiological measure can never substitute a symptom history.

Breathlessness

Breathlessness is the most significant symptom in COPD and it is associated with significant disability, poor quality of life and poor prognosis.

Cough and Sputum Production

Cough is respiratory defense mechanism protecting the airways and cough is the major method of clearing excess mucus production. In COPD patients, cough as a symptom is almost as common as breathlessness and may actually precede the onset of breathlessness. Cough is usually worse in the morning but seldom disturbs the patient’s sleep; it can, nevertheless, be disabling because of the embarrassment felt by many patients when they have bursts of productive cough on social occasions and may contribute to the isolation often imposed on patients due to breathlessness.

Wheezing

Wheezing is generally seen as an asthma symptom but frequently occurs in COPD as well. However, nocturnal wheeze is uncommon in COPD and Suggests the presence of asthma and/or heart failure.

Fatigue

Fatigue is frequently reported by COPD patients.

Other symptoms

Chest pain is a common complaint in COPD, mostly secondary to muscle pain. However, it should be noted that ischemic heart disease is frequent in any population of heavy smokers and COPD patients may be at particular risk. Acid reflux occurrence is also frequent in COPD.

Ankle swelling may result from immobility secondary to breathlessness or as result of right heart failure. Anorexia and weight loss often occurs as the disease advances and should be mirrored by measurements of body mass index (BMI) and body composition. Psychiatric morbidity is high in COPD, reflecting the social isolation, the neurological effects of hypoxemia and possibly the effects of systemic inflammation. Sleep quality is impaired in advanced disease and this may contribute to neuropsychiatric comorbidity.

How is COPD diagnosed?

The diagnosis is largely made on the clinical grounds in patients who have smoked. It is confirmed by demonstrating airflow obstruction that shows little day to day or diurnal variation and minimal response to bronchodilators. Airflow obstruction can only be accurately showed by spirometry rather than by measuring peak flow rates.

  • Many patients will only present at the time of an exacerbation and will be unaware that they have a chronic illness. Some will have had a cough or been breathless for some time but will not have recognized that these were symptoms of a lung condition. It is often only in retrospect that patients realize that they have been breathless on exertion or have had a productive cough for several years. Many smokers have a morning cough that they regard as normal for them and become breathless on exertion, which they regard as a part of normal ageing.
  • Age is risk factor for COPD and the presence of symptoms suggestive of a diagnosis of COPD in patients under the age of 40 should raise the possibility of an alternative diagnosis or an unusual etiology such as a-1 antitrypsin deficiency.

Homeopathic treatment of COPD symptoms

Homeopathy is one of the most popular holistic systems of medicine. The selection of remedy is based upon the theory of individualization and symptoms similarity by using holistic approach. This is the only way through which a state of complete health can be regained by removing all the sign and symptoms from which the patient is suffering. The aim of homeopathy is not only to treat COPD symptoms but to address its underlying cause and individual susceptibility. As far as therapeutic medication is concerned, several medicines are available for COPD symptoms treatment that can be selected on the basis of cause, sensation, modalities of the complaints. For individualized remedy selection and treatment, the patient should consult a qualified homeopathic doctor in person. There are some specific homeopathic remedies which are quite helpful in the treatment of COPD symptoms:

Kali Carb, Kali Iod, Anacardium, Cina, Carbo Veg, Lachesis, Naja, Cuprum Ars, Hepar Sulph, Lycopodium, Opium, Phosphorous, Sulphur, Spongia, Selenium, Stannum Met, Rumex, Silicea, Nux Vom, kali bi, and many other medicines..

Hpathy

This article and all other content at Hpathy.com is copyright protected by Hpathy.com. Any unauthorized copying to other websites or journals is not permitted. See the full Copyright Notice and Disclaimer at Hpathy.com

Add a comment

Register and Login to avoid filling the form below everytime you post a comment. Registered members also see less ads, can participate in forum discussions and have better site speed. Registration is Free!