Gum disease treatment



Hpathy Ezine, September, 2012 | Print This Post Print This Post |

Gum disease, causes, symptoms, diagnosis, homeopathy medicine, or homeopathic treatment for gum disease.

It is impossible to have good teeth without healthy gums. Disease of the gums leads to disease of the whole supporting structure of the teeth, and this is in turn the most common cause of tooth loss.

What causes gum disease?

It’s a combination of factors: poor hygiene (not brushing and flossing often enough or in the proper way), deficiencies in key nutrients, diseases (diabetes, viral infection, AIDS, leukemia), exposure to toxic substances (tobacco smoke, certain drugs), and birth control pills, another concern, especially for older people, is that there are many medications which have an adverse effect on gums and teeth.

The main cause of gum disease, however, is poor hygiene that allows plaque to build up along the gum line. Plaque is not just leftover food- it’s a build up of bacteria and the toxic products they produce. It sticks to the tooth surface at the gumline and can inflame the gums, a condition called gingivitis.

The gums may be reddish or purple, feel sore, bleed easily and appear puffy, soft, and swollen. Blood on the tooth brush or dental floss is one of the earliest and most common signs of gingivitis.

When gingivitis is neglected, it will eventually progress to periodontal disease, where the gums recede and the teeth loosen and eventually fall out.

Symptoms of gum disease

Symptoms of gingivitis and perodontitis include red, swollen, sore gums that bleed during or after tooth brushing; bad breath; and a bad taste in the mouth. Periodontitis symptoms also include receding gums, the formation of pockets between the teeth and gums, shifting or loose teeth, and changes in the way the teeth fit together.

Diagnosis of gum disease

Diagnosis of gum disease mainly include examination of affected area, and jaw bone X-ray to detect breakdown of bone.

Gum disease treatment with homeopathy

Homeopathy is one of the most popular holistic systems of medicine. The selection of remedy is based upon the theory of individualization and symptoms similarity by using holistic approach. This is the only way through which a state of complete health can be regained by removing all the sign and symptoms from which the patient is suffering. The aim of homeopathy is not only to treat gum disease but to address its underlying cause and individual susceptibility. As far as therapeutic medication is concerned, several remedies are available to treat gum disease that can be selected on the basis of cause, sensations and modalities of the complaints.  For individualized remedy selection and treatment, the patient should consult a qualified homeopathic doctor in person. There are following remedies which are helpful in the treatment of gum disease:

Mercurius – whole mouth moist; salivary secretions greatly increased; gums spongy, recede, bleed easily; sore pain on touch and from chewing; teeth loose, feel tender and elongated; crown of teeth decay.

Alumina – gums sore, bleeding; tensive pain in articulation of jaw when opening mouth or chewing; teeth covered with sordes.

Lachesis – gums swollen and spongy, bleeds easily; teeth ache, pain extends to ears.

Phosphorous – swelled and easily bleeding gums, ulcerated; toothache after washing clothes; tongue dry, smooth, red or white, not thickly coated. Persistent bleeding after tooth extraction.

Kreosote – very rapid decay of teeth; with spongy bleeding gums; putrid odor from mouth and bitter taste.

Aconite – gums hot and swollen; tongue coated whit, swollen; teeth sensitive to cold’ constantly moves lower jaw as if moving.

Hepar Sulph – gums and mouth painful to touch and bleed readily.

Apis Mel – great remedy for gum disease treatment; gums swollen; tongue fiery red, swollen sore and raw.

Carbo Veg – gums retracted and bleed easily; blood oozing from gums when cleaning teeth.

Argentum Nitricum – gums tender and bleed easily; tongue has prominent papillae; tip is red and painful; painful teeth.

Causticum – gums bleed easily; rheumatism of articulation of lower jaw.

Nitric acid – gums soft and spongy; bleeding from gums; putrid breath; teeth become loose.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hpathy

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Comments

  1. Leroy McKane

    September 19, 2012

    My gums have been really swollen and tender for a while. Also, my teeth are feeling a lot more loose lately. Do you think I should see a dentist?

    • tl

      December 6, 2012

      You should see a dentist as soon as possible. If your teeth are feeling loose it could mean that infection below the gum line is breaking down the bone surrounding your teeth. It happened to me. Once bone is lost around the teeth, it doesn’t grow back. If you have infection, the longer it goes untreated, the more bone you lose. Unfortunately the process can take place without pain, and you may not notice visible recession of your gums either. I lost bone and my gums looked fine. Now my teeth feel tighter than they did, but I had to have a professional “deep root planing” (not as bad as it sounds). Some people need more invasive proceedures depending on how advanced the condition is, and it won’t go away on its own by just ignoring it. If it’s to the point that your teeth feel loose, I doubt that just better brushing and flossing are enough to avoid the dentist. You need to see a dentist ASAP to see what kind of shape your gums are in and how to proceed from there. Also, make sure you ask them to clarify whether you have gingivitis (the reversible stage) or whether you actually have periodontal disease (considered incurable, needs professional maintenance to stop further tissue damage and tooth loss). Part of what made my diagnosis so devastating is that at that time, I had already thought for years that I had periodontal disease, when apparently I was still in the gingivitis stage. I didn’t do everything I could have done to reverse it because I thought I was already past that point. No one explained the difference to me until it was too late. Also, ask them to watch you floss and tell you if you’re doing it right. I know that sounds silly, but I found out the hard way it does’nt get the job done if you’re doing it wrong. Don’t be afraid to ask questions, and never stop doing research. Also, I used to clench my teeth at night and that made my teeth feel loose until I learned to stop doing it (it’s very traumatic to the bones), but you really need to rule out infection since that can cause irreversible bone loss and it’s hard to know what you’re doing while you’re sleeping. And you could have both problems, I did. I’m doing well now, but it still weighs on my mind to know that without access to professional dental care I’d be on the road to tooth loss. This economy makes me nervous, but I’m going to take advantage of the care I can get while I can. I can’t emphasize enough how important it is to take care of this, and to continue seeing your hygenist as often as they tell you to after that. If you have periodontal disease, mainstream dentistry does not have a “cure” per se. The only way they know to keep the infection from returning is cleanings every 4 months (for most of us, once we have this condition) to flush out the bacteria so they don’t multiply enough to start doing more structural damage again. Unfortunately just using a waterpik at home, although helpful (for me necessary) is not a substitute for professional cleanings. Feel free to email me if you have any questions. I am always searching for a cure, because I believe the body has the ability to heal itself, but I haven’t found it yet. If I ever do, I’ll let you know. I’ll be looking into homeopathy next, but in the mean time, I’ll be sticking to my 4 month schedule.

    • tl

      December 6, 2012

      The short answer is definitely see a dentist ASAP because what you described sounds like me shortly before I was diagnosed with periodontal disease, and I needed professional care to remove the infection that was actually breaking down the bone surrounding my teeth. You need to find out if that’s what you have, and ask them to tell you where your pocket depth is at, whether you have gingivitis or full blown periodontal disease. Have them explain the difference, and come back as often as they tell you to. It’s really important to do what they say and they don’t always explain why.

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