Free Homeopathy Journal Homeopathic Medicine Discussion Forums Homeopathy seminar Calendar Homeopathy Audio Lectures Video Lectures Free Homeopathy Books Download Homeopathic Crosswords

Nasal Polyps and Homeopathy



Hpathy Ezine, March, 2010 | Print This Post Print This Post |

Info about Nasal polyps, cause and treatment of nasal polyps, homeopathic remedies and homeopathy treatment for nasal polyps.

Abstract: Nasal polyps are frequently dealt-with cases in day-to-day practice. Among its different varieties, simple mucus polyps are very common. It has two distinct varieties – ethmoidal and antro-choanal polyps. Almost always, an allergic or infectious etiology is present. Nasal obstruction, rhinitis, headache, loss of smell, snoring, sleep apnea etc. are some of the very disturbing complaints from which the patients suffer. Appropriate diagnosis, correct general measures and judicious homeopathic approach not only uproot the disease, can also prevent recurrence of Nasal polyps quite effectively.
Keywords: Nasal polyps, Ethmoidal and Antro-choanal Polyps, Pathology, Allergic Polyp, Infective Polyp, Treatment, Homeopathic Remedies.

Nasal polyps are frequently dealt-with cases in day-to-day practice. Among its different varieties, simple mucus polyps are very common. It has two distinct varieties – ethmoidal and antro-choanal polyps. Almost always, an allergic or infectious etiology is present. Nasal obstruction, rhinitis, headache, loss of smell, snoring, sleep apnea etc. are some of the very disturbing complaints from which the patients suffer. Appropriate diagnosis, correct general measures and judicious homeopathic approach not only uproot the disease, can also prevent recurrence quite effectively.

Keywords: Ethmoidal and Antro-choanal Polyps, Pathology, Allergic Polyp, Infective Polyp, Treatment, Homeopathic Remedies.

Introduction: The para-nasal air sinuses are the cavities within the skull that open into the nose. If the soft tissue lining of the sinuses becomes inflamed, it fills the available space and expands into the nose forming a growth, called polyp (also called ‘mucus retention cysts’). As there are a number of small sinuses between the eye and the nose, when polyps do occur, there will usually be several of them. The tendency to manifest multiple polyps is called polyposis. The word ‘polyp’ (Gr.) actually has been coined from two Greek words – ‘poly’ means many and ‘pous’ means footed.

Definition: Nasal polyp is hypertrophied, pedunculated, loose, fibro-edematous mucosa of nose and the paranasal air-sinuses. The surface is lined with pseudo-stratified ciliated columnar epithelium.

Epidemiology:

  • 0.1% children and 1% adult population is affected.
  • Male: Female = 3:1
  • Chance of developing is 1-20 in 1000, after the age of 60.
  • No racial predilection.

Types:

  • Ethmoid Polyps: These are better seen on anterior rhinoscopy. These polyps are very common, especially in middle age and in elderly people. These arise from the ethmoid cells and grow towards the anterior nares. There are multiple, bluish-white or grayish, grape-like, pedunculated mass, usually bilateral, coming from the ethmoid area. There may be associated infection (pus) in the meati. Polyps, reaching anterior nares may be pinkish in color due to exposure and squamous metaplasia. Probe test shows soft, mobile, insensitive mass and differentiates from edematous turbinate. In long standing cases, there may be expansion or broadening of the external nose, called ‘frog-face‘, due to large number of polypoid mass coming out through anterior nares.
  • Antro-choanal Polyps: These are common among children and adolescents and can be better seen in posterior rhinoscopy. They arise from the maxillary antrum and extend backward to the posterior nares or choana. There is bluish-white smooth polypoid mass coming out of choanal aperture arising from the middle meatus. In advanced cases, polyp may be seen hanging behind soft palate in the oropharynx.

Diagram of sites of origin of nasal polyps

Multiple nasal polyps protruding from the left nostril

As in the picture above, if untreated, nasal polyps may cause gradual widening of the nasal bridge

In some instances, because of obstruction, a bacterial infection sets in and green nasal discharge may be seen trickling around the polyp

Endoscopic view of an ethmoid polyp in the left middle meatus

Pathology:

Etiological factors: Allergy, infection, deviated nasal septum (DNS), chronic rhino-sinusitis, genetic predisposition, autonomic nerve dysfunction, Bernoulli phenomenon etc.

Pathogenic theories: Though inconclusive, names of few accepted theories are given below –

  • Adenoma and fibroma theories;
  • Necrotizing ethmoiditis theory;
  • Glandular cyst theory;
  • Glandular hyperplasia theory;
  • Mucosal exudates theory;
  • Blockade theory;
  • Cystic dilatation of the excretory duct and vessel obstruction theory;
  • Periphlebitis and perilymphangitis theory;
  • New gland formation theory;
  • Epithelial rupture theory;
  • Ion transport theory.

Etiology: The polyps are the end-product of prolonged allergic edema of the mucosa and sub-mucosa of nose and the para-nasal air-sinuses. The sub-mucosa surrounding the middle meatus is lax and gets filled up with intracellular serous fluid and shows edematous hypertrophy. The mucosal swelling gets aggravated by traction of discharge, poor aeration of the middle meatus, efforts to clear the nose and possible interference with lymphatic flow. The edema blocks the ostium of the ethmoid air-cells and cause secondary bacterial infection. Gravity and narrowness of the meatus promote downward extension and formation of ethmoid polyps. The antro-choanal polyp arises from edematous mucosa of the maxillary sinus near the ostium and grows by edematous hypertrophy through the ostium into posterior part of the nasal cavity and nasopharynx. The ostium is directed backward; so part of the polyp is in the sinus and part in the nose and nasopharynx.

Associations:

  • Infective sinusitis (Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacteroides fragilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa etc.) (87%);
  • Cystic fibrosis / CF (3-48%);
  • Sampter’s triad: Aspirin sensitivity + Asthma + Nasal polyps (60%);
  • Asthma – allergic/non-allergic (20-50%);
  • Fungal sinusitis (80%);
  • Kartagener’s syndrome (27%);
  • Others; e.g. Churg-Strauss syndrome, non-allergic rhinitis with eosinophilic syndrome (NARES), Young’s syndrome, primary ciliary dyskinesia, selective IgA deficiency, common variable immunodeficiency (CVID), alcohol intolerance, smoking etc.

Histology: The polyps are sac-like structures with an eosinophil-rich edematous wall characterized by goblet cell hyperplasia and thickened basement membrane. Poor blood supply may give them a pale appearance. Histological section also reveals plasma cells, lymphocytes and mast cells. Polypoid tissue is rich in ground substance containing acid mucopolysaccharide.

  • Eosinophil contains granules with toxic products (e.g. leukotrienes, eosinophilic cationic protein, major basophilic protein, platelet activating factor, peroxidases, various vasoactive substances and chemotactic factors). These toxic factors are responsible for epithelial lysis, nerve damage and ciliostasis. Specific granule proteins, LTA4 and PAF apparently are responsible for the mucosal swelling and hyper-responsiveness.
  • Delayed apoptosis of eosinophils is mediated, in part, by blockage of the Fas receptors, typically by proteases that help begin the process of cell death. Delayed apoptosis is also mediated by an increase in interleukin-5, 3 and GM-CSF secreted by the T-lymphocytes. Glucocorticoids seem to help reduce polyps possibly, in part, by inhibiting IL-5.
  • Another inflammatory cell neutrophil occurs in 7% of polyp cases. This type of polyp occurs in association with cystic fibrosis or Young’s syndrome. These polyps do not respond well to corticosteroids because they lack corticosteroid-sensitive eosinophils. Degranulated mast cells are also present. Degranulation presumably occurs in a non-IgE-mediated fashion. Increased number of plasma cells, lymphocytes and myofibroblasts also occur.
  • There are various chemical mediators which play important roles in the formation of the polyps; e.g.

ü   Cytokines: IL-1, 5 (rarely 3, 4)

Subhranil Saha

DR. SUBHRANIL SAHA, B.H.M.S. Hons. (C.U.) graduated in Homeopathy (B.H.M.S.) from Mahesh Bhattacharyya Homeopathic Medical College & Hospital, Govt. of West Bengal, India under the University of Calcutta with honors in Anatomy & Pathology and highest grades in Anatomy, Pathology, Surgery, Practice of Medicine, Materia Medica & Repertory. He has been practicing the last 5 years. In addition to the polychrests, he emphasizes the use of rare medicines to discover their essences. He is also holds diplomas in HIV, Yoga & Physiotherapy, Counseling, Nutritition and Child Care.

Comments

  1. clement

    March 24, 2010

    Excellent Subhranil Saha. Good work you have given everything from the base.
    Everyday million of members search for nose related problem. This is the best place to know everything.

  2. Avinash Agnihotri

    March 27, 2010

    A thorough study and description.Professionally very helpful to treat a disease that defies common attempts to cure.Even surgery is not always beneficial. Goodluck and Godbless

  3. Dr.Rangadhar

    April 10, 2010

    U have given a long list of meds. it would have been better if you would repertorised it systematic way. Two important medicine you have forgotten to include without which you can not give a permanent cure to any nasal polyp that are the nosode CARCINOCIN and CIRRHINUM

  4. Vikas Gupta

    April 29, 2010

    Hi Subhranil,

    If a patient has got approx 2″ long polyp, do you still believe that it can be cured by Homeopathy medicines?

    Rgds,
    Vikas

  5. Dr.Saif(Allopath & Homeopath)

    November 7, 2010

    1. an excellent article on nasal polyps.
    2. please give some information about the role of Tuberculinum, Bacillinum, Medorrhinum, Calcarea iodide, Kali iodide, Sulphur and Carcinocin in the treatment of polyps.
    Thanks!
    Dr.Saif(Allopath & Homeopath)

Homeopathy 4 Everyone
Subscribe the world's most popular homeopathy journal for Free!
Never display this again