Passive Case Witnessing Problem

It’s a case of a 6 year old girl who consulted me on 18/12/08.

The very first peculiar thing we observe about the child is …she enters the consulting room holding mothers hand tightly.

M: She has made a drawing for you.

(Child’s sibling is also our patient. Every time when this child used to accompany her sister, she would draw and now also she has got the following drawings. This itself shows us the child’s intense connection with her subconscious through this form of art.)

M: She does not have any health problem as such but I wanted to start treatment for her overall development.

PASSIVE CASE WITNESSING PROCESS

D:        Tell me what’s happening to you..? Can I send your mother out?

P: No.

OBSERVATION: Clings tightly to her mother.

D:        Okay, tell me what’s your name?

P: OBSERVATION: Sitting in mothers lap with her hands around mother’s neck. N……P……

D:        Tell me more about you?

P: PAUSE

OBSERVATION: Smiles and clings more to the mother.

D:        Tell me what are your interest and hobbies? What you like to do?

P: I like to swim, like to draw, I like running…playing.

D:        Wow! What else?

P: I like to play on the computer, like to watch TV.

OBSERVATION: Now she removes her hand from the mother’s neck and sits leaning on the table, yet she is in her mothers lap.

D:        What else you like to do?

P: Like to go to school.

D:        Very nice, very nice you are talking?

M: You sit on the chair and talk to the doctor.

P: OBSERVATION; child sits on a chair next to the mother but still holding her arm.

As the mother starts to leave the room, the child jumps off the chair, starts crying and goes and hugs the mother, and goes out with her.)

(The mother comes in with her after some time but now the child sits on the chair and mother on the sofa behind her.)

D:        OK, so tell me what else you like to do?

P: I’ll like to play – go on a slide. Like to read books.

D:        Very nice. You are speaking so well. What else you like to do?

P: Like to dance… then I like to play, then I do homework.

OBSERVATION: Looks behind towards the  mother.

ACTIVE CASE WITNESSING PROCESS

D:        And what are you scared of?

P: Scared of lions, tigers…

D:        What else?

P: Bhoot.

The mother had some work and she had to go out of the room. Immediately the child said no.

D:        You are speaking so well. Just talk with me and your mother will come in 2 minutes.

P: No…no…(OBSERVATION: She gets up and clings to mother and starts crying)

D:        OK you don’t talk, but can you draw till your mom comes back?

(She sits on the chair and starts drawing.)

(Since she was not ready to communicate even after so much of encouragement and the fact that at the beginning she had brought drawings, we ask her to draw.)

OBSERVATION: She covers the paper with the hand and also draws at one lower section of the page.)

D:        Wow! What is this?

P: This is my sister & me, & this is my father and my brother.

D:        And what is this?

P: A heart.

ACTIVE – ACTIVE CASE WITNESSING PROCESS…

D:        What is this heart doing here?

P: I love heart so I drew it.

D:        Earlier also you drew hearts. What about this heart you love?

P: I love heart like that only.

D:        Heart with arrows what does this mean?

P: Looking into the drawing. (PAUSE)

D:        What are you all doing?

P: We all are looking at the heart and thinking what is it.

D:        What does the heart mean?

P: I don’t know.

D:        You like drawing heart huh. When do you draw it?

P: In school. In my drawing class. I draw heart and stars and one day I drew heart and star in the Christmas tree.

D:        In this drawing who is having the flower? (We spotted a flower in the drawing she had made.)

P: My sister- she is just holding it.

D:        She is going to give it to someone or what?

P: Me.

D:        And heart will go to whom.

P: To my brother and father.

D:        Why?

P: Like that only.

D:        Like that only. OK… Would you like to draw something more for me?

D:        Wow! What is this?

P: A drawing.

D:        Of what?

P: Drawing of a garden. This is me and my brother.

D:        What are you both doing here?

P: We have come here to play.

D:        What are you playing?

P: Running and catching.

D:        What is this?

P: Flowers.

D:        Which flower are they?

P: This is flower, this rose and…this …this is pink flower.

D:        Draw one more thing for me?

P: OBSERVATION:  She draws human figures and then joins all of them together.

D:        Wow! What is this? I don’t know what it is.

P: My family.

D:        What’s your family doing here?

P: Ring-a-ring-a-roses.

D:        Ring-a-ring-a-roses. What’s that?

P: I don’t know.

D:        Whom you like the most in your family?

P: My mom.

D:        What about mom you like the most.

P: (PAUSE)

D:        You like or your sister likes?

P: I like more.

D:        What else?

P: (PAUSE)

ACTIVE – ACTIVE IN DIFFERENT AREA – FEAR

D:        What are you scared the most.

P: Lion and tiger.

D:        What about them scares you the most?

P: Because lion crawls and eat us.

D:        What else do they do.

P: Smiles.

D:        You said previously that you are also scared of ghost. What about them scares you?

P: (PAUSE) … I saw the movie called Road side Romeo. (This is a bollywood movie)

(Here when we ask her about fears, she herself goes to the area of movies, so we become active- active to explore this area.)

ACTIVE – ACTIVE IN DIFFERENT AREA -MOVIES

D:        What is there in that movie?

P: There’s a dog, many dogs but 1 dog’s name is Romeo.

D:        Go on?

P: There is a girl called Leila and she loved…. and that dog he loved Leila..

D:        I don’t know what they do? Love means what?

P: I don’t know.

D:        What about the movie do you like the most?

P: I like Leila.

D:        What about Leila you like?

P: (PAUSE)

OBSERVATION: leans on the table and hides mouth behind both palms.

D:        Which other movies you like?

P: Romeo & Jaane tu… (It’s a Bollywood romantic movie.)

D:        And what is there in that movie Jaane tu…?

P: I forget.

D:        Anything else about you.

P: Nods no.

D:        So you like all movies with love/

P: Nods Yes.

D:        What about it you like?

P: I don’t know… because nice things happen.

D:        What?

P: Like they don’t shout, they don’t hit and all.

D:        Anything else.

P: No.

Child goes out and comes back with another drawing along with the mother.

MOTHER’S OBSERVATION OF THE CHILD

She is very affectionate child.  She will go and give big hugs even to strangers. She is very fond of her younger brother and she will make him understand things by saying you can win this or that and she lets him win. Actually she is friendly with anybody and everybody.

END OF THE CASE

—————————————————

UNDERSTANDING OF THE CASE

OU OF PLACE/ OUT OF ORDER

Passive case witnessing process

Verbally the child didn’t speak anything peculiar but our observations regarding the child were very peculiar…

• Her clinging.
• Sitting in the mother’s lap.
• Holding mother tightly.
• Holding her hand while talking.
• Hugging the mother.

Active case witnessing process

• Clings to mother as she tries to go out of the room.
• Covering the paper with hand while drawing.
• A heart.

Active-Active case witnessing process

• I love heart .
• I drew heart and star in the Christmas tree.
• Drawing of a garden
• Flowers.
• Draws human figures and then joins all of them together.
• Too much family attachment.
• Ring-a-ring-a-roses.
• That dog he loved Laila Leila
• Like they don’t shout, they don’t hit and all.

WHAT IS THE FOCUS/CENTRE/ESSENCE OF THE CASE

• Love, attachment and togetherness.
• Love for heart.

This is very evident from her body language and all her drawings. Also this further gets confirmed from the mother’s observation of the child.

WHICH KINGDOM?

• Pure sensitivity seen.
• Drawings of garden, flowers.

This clearly points to the PLANT KINGDOM.

WHICH FAMILY?

This tremendous attachment to the mother, togetherness of the family, hugging and clinginess, love for hearts is very suggestive of the MALVALES family.

WHICH MIASM?

We observed that whenever she draws she covers the paper with her hand. This gives a hint of the SYCOTIC MIASM.

WHICH REMEDY?

The remedy from the Malvales family with Sycotic miasm running in the centre is TILIA EUROPA. BUT in the case we observed that along with the general theme of the Malvales family, the child’s focus was “Heart”. So when a further inquisitive search was made keeping focus on the “Heart” interestingly we found out a remedy TILIA CORDATA which also belongs to the same family where the leaves of the tree are heart shaped.
Thus the remedy given was TILIA CORDATA.

WHICH POTENCY?

At the end of Passive case witnessing process, verbally the child seemed to be at the ‘Name and Fact’ level but the peculiar body language which we didn’t understand initially and which got connected later on with the whole phenomenon, represented the child’s complete altered energy pattern. Thus the child (non-verbally) vibrated at the Delusion level. Therefore the potency given was 1M, single dose.

A follow up drawing

END OF THE CASE

STAPHISAGRIA



Hpathy Ezine, October, 2009 | Print This Post |

(Stavesacre.) (From vol. v, 2nd edit. 1826.) (A drachm of the seeds of Delphinium staphisagria is pulverised, along with an equal quantity of chalk (for the purpose of absorbing the oil), and macerated, without heat and daily succession, for a week in 600 drops of alcohol, in order to form the tincture.) The ancient may have made a very rude employment of this seed in order to excite vomiting or salivation, as we may see in DIOSCORIDES, who, however, also talks about its administration for toothache in general, the origin of which application is evidently domestic practice. JOH. HEINR. SCHULZE (Theses de Materia Medica, editae a C.G. STRUMPFF, Hal., 1746, p. 435) when suffering from toothache took some of it in his mouth, but it gave him such a violent exacerbation that he thought he should go mad. What enormous power must not this drug possess! As an exterminator of head vermin this seed was called by the Greeks ????okokov, and as such it still enters into the composition of an officinal ointment (unguentum pediculorum). Now, as out new and only true healing art shows by experience that every drug is medicinal in proportion to the energy of its action on the health, and that is only overcomes that natural disease by virtue of its pathogenetic power provided it is analogous to the latter; it follows that a medicine can subdue the most serious diseases the most injuriously it acts on health human beings and that we have only to […]

(Stavesacre.)

(From vol. v, 2nd edit. 1826.)

(A drachm of the seeds of Delphinium staphisagria is pulverised, along with an equal quantity of chalk (for the purpose of absorbing the oil), and macerated, without heat and daily succession, for a week in 600 drops of alcohol, in order to form the tincture.)

The ancient may have made a very rude employment of this seed in order to excite vomiting or salivation, as we may see in DIOSCORIDES, who, however, also talks about its administration for toothache in general, the origin of which application is evidently domestic practice.

JOH. HEINR. SCHULZE (Theses de Materia Medica, editae a C.G. STRUMPFF, Hal., 1746, p. 435) when suffering from toothache took some of it in his mouth, but it gave him such a violent exacerbation that he thought he should go mad. What enormous power must not this drug possess!

As an exterminator of head vermin this seed was called by the Greeks ????okokov, and as such it still enters into the composition of an officinal ointment (unguentum pediculorum).

Now, as out new and only true healing art shows by experience that every drug is medicinal in proportion to the energy of its action on the health, and that is only overcomes that natural disease by virtue of its pathogenetic power provided it is analogous to the latter; it follows that a medicine can subdue the most serious diseases the most injuriously it acts on health human beings and that we have only to ascertain exactly its peculiar injurious effects in order to know to what curative purposes to may be applied in the art of restoring human health. Its power, be it ever so energetic, does not by any means call for its rejection; nay, it makes it all the more valuable; for, on the one hand, its power of altering the human health only reveals to us all the more distinctly and clearly the peculiar morbid states which it can produce on healthy human beings, so that we may all the more surely and indubitably discover the cases of disease in which it is to be employed in similarity (homoeopathically) and therefore curatively; whilst, on the other hand, its energy, be that ever so great, may be easily moderated by appropriate dilution and reduction of dose, so that it shall become only useful and not hurtful if it is found to correspond in the greatest possible similarity to the symptoms of the disease we wish to cure. It is just to the most powerful medicines in the smallest doses that we may look for the greatest curative virtue in the most serious diseases of peculiar character for which this and no other medicine is suitable.

For these unexceptionable reasons I anticipated a great treasure of curative action in the most peculiar diseases from staphisagria; and these reasons of which are recorded in the following symptoms. Thus, curative virtues have been elicited from this medicinal substances which are of infinitely greater value than its power to kill lice (the only medicinal property the ordinary quackish medical art knew it to possess) – curative virtues which the homoeopathic practitioner may make use of with marvellous effect in rare morbid states, for which there is no other remedy but this.

Ten drops of tincture are first intimately mixed by succession with two strokes of the arm with ninety drops of alcohol in order to obtain the first dilution (1/100); of this one drop mixed in the same way with another 100 drops of alcohol gives the 1/10000th dilution; and in this manner through thirty diluting phials in all, the dilution is brought so far that the last phial, which is that destined for medicinal use, contains a decillion-fold dilution (to be marked1/x), of which the smallest portion of a drop (a sugar globule the size is a poppy seed moistened with it) is to be employed as a dose.

I have seen the action of a larger dose more than three weeks.

Camphor subdues the excessive action of this medicine, and is a principal antidote of staphisagria.

[HAHNEMANN’s fellow-provers were CUBITZ, FRANZ, GROSS, GUTMANN. HARTMANN, HAYNEL, HERRMANN. HORNBURG, KUMMER, LANGHAMMER, STAPF, TEUTHORN.]

No old-school authorities are cited.

The 1st edit has 606 symptoms, this 2nd edit,. 721.]

STAPHISAGIRA

In the room vertigo, like stupefaction, not on the open air.

On stooping and on turning the head quickly vertigo; every thing whirled round on half a circle (only once).

Vertigo: when walking he ran up against the door.

Vertigo when lying in bed in the evening as if all turned round with him.

5. Whirling vertigo, especially when sitting, diminished by walking about (aft. 1 h.). [Ctz.]

Giddy (aft. 8.1/2 h.). [Gn.]

When standing and speaking confusion of the head, as if vertigo would come on, lasting a long time (aft. 14 h.). [Hnl.]

Whirling in the forehead and dulness in the head (aft. 5 h.). [Stf.]

Confusion of the head, only in front on the centre of the forehead on a small spot the size of a finger-tip, like stupidity – in the street he did not know whether he was walking to the right or left: he had to take great care.

10. Confusion of the head only in fits; sometimes his head was quite free and clear.

The head is confused, as if stupid and heavy (aft. ½ h.). [Hnl.]

The head is always confused and the spirits depressed. [Kr.]

Obtuseness of the mind, which kept him from work of all sorts.

Dazed in the head as in catarrh. [Stf.]

15. When he wishes to seize on an idea it escapes him. Vanishing of the thoughts; when he speaks or reflects on any subject and some one interrupts him, or suggests to him another thought, he immediately forgets the first thought and cannot recall it. [Gss.]

Vanishing of the thoughts (memory disturbed by fancies); when he reflects on anything so many things confusedly mixed together occur to him that he cannot get rid of them and quite forgets what he wished to think about. [Gss.]

Samuel Hahnemann

Samuel Hahnemann

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