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Achieving Freedom from Prejudice – The Unprejudiced Observer



Hpathy Ezine, July, 2009 | Print This Post Print This Post |

Achieving Freedom from Prejudice – The Unprejudiced Observer

The concept of unprejudiced behavior is a cornerstone of homeopathic practice as stated by Dr. Samuel Hahnemann in the Organon of Medicine (Aph:6). He rightly identifies the central problem of perceiving in homeopathic practice as that of prejudice. “this … demands of the physician nothing but freedom from prejudice … in tracing the picture of disease”. (Aph: 83)

As a homeopath and a teacher of homeopathy functioning in various roles, I have always experienced an urgent need to understand clearly what prejudice is. The selection of this topic for my dissertation has given me a much needed opportunity to explore my learning in this area.

What is prejudice? What is its link to perceiving? How is perceiving linked to perception? Are perceptual niceties and difficulties linked in any way with niceties and difficulties of perceiving? We will explore this at the outset.

Perception and Perceiving

The link between perception and perceiving, we can say, is observation. Let us observe the two pictures below and see what is revealed.

Picture 1

What do you see in Picture 1?

If we carefully observe it, we can see horses camouflaged in the background. There are 5 such horses that can be seen distinctly. All one needs is careful observation so that the details may not be missed, as the images may be inseparable from their background. With partial observation, one may miss the 4th or the 5th horse.

Picture 2 should now be easier to observe and comment upon.

Picture 2

What do you see now in Picture 2? Many people beautifully describe the picture as a romantic couple standing on the seashore near a weird shaped tree, probably very old. The couple is watching the sunset and admiring the mountains on the horizon. My son asked me whether I could see an infant in it. I searched but could not find it. Even the small stone lying near the couple was not it.  My wife standing next to me could see the infant in no time, but it took me 24 hours to see the infant in the picture.

Can we not see, like the picture hidden in the picture, a meaning hidden behind the surface in the complaints of the patient? Or can we not see, like in the picture, the story of the Observer unfolding behind the evaluation of the patient?

Prejudice and Its nature

Now that I am in the sixth decade of life, I have taken this opportunity to revisit the areas in Life and Living (1981) to understand the deeper meanings of the unprejudiced observer in general and homeopathy in particular.

More often than not, what we call our beliefs and our knowledge are our prejudices, and we are not even aware of this fact, let alone being able to overcome them. Prejudice is not at the conscious level but subconscious and still deeper into the unconscious and its recognition becomes the first step in overcoming it.

The Practical Meaning of “Unprejudiced”

Sometimes one can say with affirmation that one is aware of one’s prejudices. One knows of other people who are this aware, and they take care that it does not affect their functioning in any area of life – family, work or social life. When this state is achieved, then the person can be said to be free from prejudice, i.e. unprejudiced. This can be understood as the practical, working definition of the unprejudiced observer – different than given in books, and is the most stable position to achieve.

The key to this achievement is our ability to observe. We learn to observe – others first and then ourselves. Finding our way through the errors of mal-observation and non-observation we gradually learn to be objective in our assessment so that we perceive the patient truly and well. This is taken up further through the cases.

Prejudice and State of Health

While living our life, we are constantly faced with questions like:

Who am I?

What am I doing?

Why am I doing what I’m doing?

Am I evolving or am I stagnant?

Am I enjoying health, happiness, harmony and peace?

Or am I dissatisfied, unhappy, having ill health?

Having examined both the states in my life, I have understood the cost of health. I have understood how a prejudiced (faulty) lifestyle results in production of disease. This teaches us the deeper impact of prejudice on ourselves. Therefore I felt the need to explore this subject in detail and present a way by which it can be dealt with and hence reduce its ill effects.

Dr. ML Dhawale

The late Dr. ML Dhawale from 1968 onwards was actively involved in translating the concepts of homeopathic philosophy into practice. After a thorough study of the Organon, he concluded that Hahnemann had given all the directives regarding education and training in the first six aphorisms of the Organon, as follows:

Aim of education and training – Aphorism 1,2

Curriculum of education and training – Aphorism 3,4

Methods and Techniques – Aphorism 5,6

Passing through this process helps him to understand the meaning of prejudice, recognition of prejudice and freedom from prejudice. The learner evolves the professional competence to meet the demand of homeopathic practice.

Group discussion makes the learner aware of his prejudices and he deals with them through the different roles, like an observer in the clinical session and then through the sharing of experience in the role of guide, supervisor and evaluator in the group session. Learn, analyze and evaluate self and others, and in the process know thy self and heal thyself.

NL Tiwari

NL Tiwari Director, Rural Health Services

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