Homeopathy Papers Organon & Philosophy

When You Have the Right Vibe, It’s Not a Coincidence: Synchronicities, Energy Healing, and Other Strangeness in the Field

Homeopathy is the science of healing based on similarity of vibration. The Law of Similars essentially says: likes cure likes. Bring two things of like vibration together — a remedy and a patient — and the effect will be a cure of the patient’s disease.

The following is excerpted from Active Consciousness: Awakening the Power Within [1], recently released from R.L.Ranch Press.

 


 

One piece of evidence for the holographic nature of nonstandard fields that have been proposed in recent years — the zero-point field (a candidate for the unified field [2]), the psi field of psychic phenomena, Ervin Laszlo’s Akashic field [3], and the morphic field proposed by Rupert Sheldrake [4] — is that they all share a common feature: sensitivity to similarity in vibration.

If a holographic image has many different holograms embedded within it, shining a laser of a specific frequency upon it will cause only those holograms made with lasers of the same frequency to stand out.  That’s because things with the same vibration naturally resonate and reinforce one another — just as two violin strings at the same pitch resonate with one another. This property of resonance has [also] been used to explain how each of us might interact with mysterious fields like the psi or Akashic fields… People pick up only that with which they personally “resonate.” Each individual’s resonant frequency, determined by their life experience, physical body, and energy body, limits what they can perceive.

Biologist Rupert Sheldrake’s theory of morphic resonance also depends upon similarity in vibration. Members of the same species, being “on the same wavelength,” are able to tap into information that pertains uniquely to them. And while members of an entire species might be able to tune into a fairly broad spectrum of frequencies (think of Carl Jung’s notion of the collective unconscious that humans supposedly tap into [5]), smaller, more tightly connected groups — such as members of the same family or loving couples — resonate in more focused zones of vibration; they have access to their own “private frequency.” In fact, Sheldrake goes even further and suggests that morphic fields can explain how human memory operates. Instead of being stored in our brains, he suggests that memories are stored in the morphic field. Our brains then pick them up via resonance, like radios tuning to their own private stations.

The existence and importance of similarity in vibration has also popped up in psi experiments. For example, individuals gifted at psychokinesis — the ability to affect physical objects with the mind — have described the experience as a feeling of resonance with those objects. A fascinating body of evidence has also been uncovered by Dean Radin and his colleague Roger Nelson at Princeton’s PEAR lab… [R]esearchers at PEAR found that connected couples can influence random event generators (REGs) more effectively than individuals working alone. Because of this phenomenon, Radin and Nelson decided to test for even larger field effects by using these random devices as “antennae.” First they placed REGs at events where people were all focused on the same thing and therefore “vibrating” similarly-for example, at music festivals, religious events, and even at the Academy Awards. The results were as predicted; these venues did indeed cause the machines’ outputs to deviate from the norm [6, 7].

Then, in 1997, they decided to place REGs at fifty locations all over the world, run them continuously, and see if they could pick up on major world events. The results were astounding. Over the next ten years, Radin and Nelson studied the machines’ reactions to 205 major world events and discovered that they did indeed respond to events that were intense on a global level — especially those that were tragic. The most striking effects occurred in response to the events on 9/11, which caused the largest daily average correlation between the machines’ outputs. Even more amazing, this correlation became noticeable a few hours before the first of the twin towers was hit! [8, 9] An instance of collective precognition?

Whereas world events less horrific than 9/11 probably evoke more varied vibratory responses in people (and therefore do not resonate and amplify each other as well), truly frightening events tend to evoke a more common, coherent response. As this study showed, when nearly all of the people on Earth “got onto the same wavelength” on 9/11, even machines noticed…

 

Synchronicity and Fields of Meaning

Similarity in vibration has also been used to explain the phenomenon of synchronicity — “coincidences” of seemingly unrelated events that share a common meaning… [A] well-known illustration of this phenomenon was described by psychiatrist Carl Jung, the originator of the notion of synchronicity [10]. One of Jung’s patients was recounting her dream about a golden scarab beetle when he heard a rapping on the window. When he opened it, a rose chafer beetle — the insect most similar to a scarab in Jung’s region — flew into the room. Jung quickly put two and two together. He realized that the mythological meaning of the scarab — an ancient Egyptian symbol for rebirth — was highly pertinent to his patient’s problems. And this was also the reason why the insect had appeared in waking life.

The phenomenon of synchronicity demonstrates a key point — the universe may not be operating like a cold, meaningless machine after all. Instead, the reality we experience each day may be flooded with fields of meaning. One field might embody the horror and violence of 9/11. Another field might be associated with a hope for rebirth. Each field of meaning has a particular vibration to it, and objects, individuals, emotions, dreams, and events with similar vibrations will tend to resonate with one another and then co-occur. This is what creates synchronicities. In fact, various theories of quantum physics require the existence of synchronicities [11]…

Think about it. There may be another fundamental mechanism at play in our universe besides cause and effect. Most of us think that everything that occurs in our world is due to some causal mechanism.  A causes B causes C. However, synchronicity — the co-occurrence of events within the same field of meaning — may be another fundamental reason why things tend to happen. Many things in life that we think are due to cause-and-effect or mere coincidence may actually be due to synchronicity.

Here’s an example that occurred while I was writing this book. My husband Steve and I had long admired Rupert Sheldrake’s work on morphic fields but had never met him. To us, he was a brilliant scientist living far away in England. However, in September 2008, just as I was working on the section of this book that describes his work, Steve got word that Sheldrake would be giving a talk at his research laboratory at Sun Microsystems. Now please understand; talks about things like the morphic field are not commonplace in computer research labs. In fact, Sheldrake’s talk was poorly attended. But it just so happened that one of the lab’s researchers had met Sheldrake in Scotland and had invited him to speak the next time he was in our area. When Steve heard about Sheldrake’s visit, he asked if I could also attend, and we both received an invitation to have lunch with him the next day. Before I could even finish writing about Rupert Sheldrake, I was sitting and having lunch with him! Coincidence? Or synchronicity?…

 

A Meaningful Cure

The powerful influence of similarity in vibration has also made its way into healing. In fact, it is the very foundation of homeopathy — an alternative medical system originally developed in Germany in the early 1800s. The word “homeopathy” literally means similar (homeo) suffering (pathy), and practitioners of homeopathy choose medicines for their patients based on a principle of cure called the Law of Similars. This principle can be described as follows:

If a substance is shown experimentally to cause a specific pattern of emotional, physical, and behavioral symptoms in healthy test subjects, then that substance can be prepared so that it can cure individuals suffering from the same pattern of symptoms.

In other words, homeopathy is the science of healing based on similarity of vibration. The Law of Similars essentially says: “likes cure likes.” Bring two things of like vibration together — a remedy and a patient — and the effect will be a cure of the patient’s disease.

Here’s a simple illustration. We all know the common effects of drinking coffee:  wakefulness, a mind full of thoughts, excited happiness, acute senses, and sometimes heart palpitations and diarrhea. These symptoms are manifestations of the vibration of coffee, and coffee imparts these qualities to those who drink it. Now, if a patient comes to a homeopath seeking help for chronic insomnia, and their insomnia is characterized by an overactive mind, excitement, acuteness of the senses, heart palpitations, and diarrhea, it is likely that the homeopath will prescribe Coffea Cruda — a remedy prepared from coffee. That’s because this patient manifests the same vibrational qualities as coffee. And if the remedy is truly homeopathic to the patient — that is, if coffee’s symptoms match his or her overall emotional, mental, and physical state — it has the potential to completely cure their insomnia, not just palliate it as a sleeping pill would do.

About the author

Amy Lansky

Amy Lansky

Amy L. Lansky, PhD was a Silicon Valley computer scientist when her life was transformed by the miraculous homeopathic cure of her son"™s autism. In April 2003 she published Impossible Cure: The Promise of Homeopathy, one of the best-selling books on homeopathy in the USA (www.impossiblecure.com). Her new book is Active Consciousness: Awakening the Power Within. Amy is an executive board member of the National Center for Homeopathy in the United States.

Leave a Comment

4 Comments

  • I would call what you describe above as 1) a resonance of similars and 2) a magnetizing toward what we value, but not fields of meaning. Imaginative persons tend to *attribute* meaning, which may contribute to the richness of life experience, as long as we know that attribution of meaning is a construct or added-on significance on top of what IS.

    • Hi Carol.

      Well, what is the definition of “meaning”. If a Jung’s patient had a dream about a scarab beetle, which is an Egyptian symbol of rebirth, and the subject of “rebirth” was relevant to her mental state, and the beetle came into the room when she was talking about her dream (a synchronicity), how is this not related to “meaning”? Or a watch stops just when a person dies, how is that not related to the “meaning” of death? Yes, it’s similarity in vibration too. Perhaps that is the “definition” of meaning — a particular vibration, but to us humans, it is defined in our brain as meaning.

    • Hi Korspilly. Medicines are prepared in a mixture of alcohol and water, not just alcohol. I believe some of these experiments also were conducted on such a mixture. However, there actually have been physics dilution studies on structures in alcohol as well (see my book, Impossible Cure), and alcohol was actually found to retain structures even better. Hope this helps.
      -Amy