Revisiting: 4 Day Migraine–Homeopathy To The Rescue!

So in your case, not finding Rhus tox listed under “Headache, migraine”?  Guess what?  It’s under “One-sided Headache” in the same chapter!!!!!  And what is a migraine?  It’s a one-sided headache!!!!!  And guess where else Rhus tox is listed?  “Left-sided headache”!  I know, I know!

So what is the moral of this story?  The Repertory can’t be construed as having only one author!  It’s like the Bible.  If you’ve ever tried to read it, which I have, you will find that it’s not consistent, and it’s not unusual for one part to contradict another part!  It’s like when God banished Cain from the Garden of Eden for killing his brother Abel, and Cain says, “Oh no!  Don’t do that God, don’t send me some place where I’ll be a stranger and won’t know anybody and nobody will like me!”  And I’m, like, “Hey!  Ain’t nobody here but you and your parents!  And a serpent!  What other ‘people’ are you talking about?”

But anyway, as I was discussing with Maria, when you look at Repertory rubrics, you have to always be thinking!  Rhus tox is a polychrest, meaning it covers many diseases and conditions as long as you find its famous characteristics in the case, like “better heat”!  So when an expected remedy like Rhus tox is suspiciously missing from a rubric, ask yourself, “Can this rubric be worded differently and found somewhere else?  Maybe in another chapter?”  Give that a try and you might find a much more inclusive rubric, or worded in the contrary as “worse” this, or “worse” that instead of “better” this or that!  “Better heat” can also be found as “Cold agg.”  Sometimes what you want isn’t in the chapter you think it ought to be in so you have to go to “Generals”, or “Mind”, etc. to find it.  Sometimes what you think ought to be in “Abdomen” is actually in “Intestines”, and so on.

So, OK, listen everybody, aside from wanting to thank everyone who voted, I would also like to pay my respects to Sylvester Potts of The Contours who just passed away January 6th in Detroit, Michigan.  He was 78 years old.

The Contours were famous for their million-seller, “Do You Love Me (Now That I Can Dance)” from 1962 on Motown Records.

Here is a very rare in-concert video of The Contours.  There aren’t a lot of videos of black performers from back in the day, so, we’re lucky to have what little we’ve got; it’s not gonna be perfect, is all I’m sayin’.  Sylvester Potts is standing next to lead singer, Billy Gordon; watch his amazing dance moves!  (Of course, they all CAN dance!)  Billy Gordon calls him “Boom” because Sylvester is the bass singer, and he has a little solo spot towards the end of the song:

Rest in Peace, Sylvester; yes, we do love you, now that you can dance–again!  

See ya next time for another great and wonderful Hpathy Quiz!!!!

 


Elaine Lewis, D.Hom., C.Hom.

Elaine takes online cases! Write to her at [email protected]

Visit her website: elaineLewis.hpathy.com

About the author

Shana Lewis

Shana Lewis

Shana spices up the Hpathy Quiz with her timely announcements and reviews on the latest in pop culture. Her vast knowledge of music before her time has inspired the nickname: "Shanapedia"!

About the author

Elaine Lewis

Elaine Lewis

Elaine Lewis, D.Hom., C.Hom.
Elaine is a passionate homeopath, helping people offline as well as online. Contact her at [email protected]
Elaine is a graduate of Robin Murphy's Hahnemann Academy of North America and author of many articles on homeopathy including her monthly feature in the Hpathy ezine, "The Quiz". Visit her website at:
https://elainelewis.hpathy.com/ and TheSilhouettes.org

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