Fright

Last modified on January 3rd, 2019

Fright

 

– The consequences of fear and sudden fright are often most serious, and the senseless practice of practical joking cannot be too strongly condemned. Diarrhoea, fever, convulsions, and even mental derangement are frequently met with as consequences of fright.

Medicines. – (Every half-hour, or according to urgency.)

Aconite3. – Fright with vexation; difficult breathing, and violent pains in the pit of stomach.

Opium.3. – Immediately after fright; if still fearful, faintness, twitching of limbs, involuntary passage of water with stools, fits, perspiration and red face.

Belladonna3.

– Great agitation remaining after fits (after Opium); derangement of mind; blood rushes to the head; face red, burning hot; patient cannot bear anything about the neck; sleepless; raving mad; would run away; fears imaginary things.

Ignat.3.

– Fainting fits, if the patient becomes very pale; twitching of the limbs; stiffness of the back; if the fright is followed by sadness or grief.

Pulsatilla3.

– Diarrhoea.

Veratrum3.

– Involuntary evacuations, patient cold and trembling; fear of special things.

Stramonium3.

– Children fear to go to bed in the evening; fear of dark.

Arsen.3.

– Fear of being alone.

Pulsatilla3.

– Afraid of people.

About the author

John Henry Clarke

John Henry Clarke

John Henry Clarke MD (1853 – November 24, 1931 was a prominent English classical homeopath. Dr. Clarke was a busy practitioner. As a physician he not only had his own clinic in Piccadilly, London, but he also was a consultant at the London Homeopathic Hospital and researched into new remedies — nosodes. For many years, he was the editor of The Homeopathic World. He wrote many books, his best known were Dictionary of Practical Materia Medica and Repertory of Materia Medica

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