Sick-room

Last modified on January 3rd, 2019

Sick-room

 

SICK-ROOM.–The chief requisites for the sick-room are–plenty of fresh air of moderate temperature, as much light as is agreeable to the patient, and quietness.

By way of furniture, there should be just as much as the patient and nurse require, and no more–bed, one or two tables, and a couple of chairs. The bed should have no curtains or hangings. For ventilation there is nothing better than an open fireplace and fire enough to keep the room at a proper temperature. If the weather is cold it is well, when possible, to keep a window open in an adjacent room, and a good fire burning. If the door of this room is kept open, and also the door of the sick-room (as much or as little as is desired), the fresh warm air will be drawn from the vacant room into the sick-room. Otherwise the window of the sick-room may be kept open so long as there is no draught on the bed.

Quietness is a great requisite. Only as many people as are required to attend on the patient should be allowed in the room at one time. The number of visitors should be strictly controlled by the medical man, as there is nothing more fatiguing to a patient (especially during convalescence) than to see persons whom he has not constantly about him.

About the author

John Henry Clarke

John Henry Clarke

John Henry Clarke MD (1853 – November 24, 1931 was a prominent English classical homeopath. Dr. Clarke was a busy practitioner. As a physician he not only had his own clinic in Piccadilly, London, but he also was a consultant at the London Homeopathic Hospital and researched into new remedies — nosodes. For many years, he was the editor of The Homeopathic World. He wrote many books, his best known were Dictionary of Practical Materia Medica and Repertory of Materia Medica

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