Eczema

Last modified on January 3rd, 2019

Eczema

 

Eczema is a disease of the skin characterized by the formation of minute watery vesicles which soon break and leave a raw, moist surface. Eczema is one of the commonest of skin diseases, and many persons are subject to it periodically, especially in the spring and autumn.

It is often an indication of the state of the general health, and sometimes it acts as a relief to the internal organs. Many patients watch for the appearance of their eczema, as they know they will feel better when it comes. All attempts, therefore, to heal the eruptions without attention to the general health should be carefully avoided. The disease should be healed from within, or something worse will take its place. Eczema is one of the commonest expressions of the chronic disease called by Hahnemann Psora.

General Treatment – In acute eczema it is advisable to put the patient on an absolute milk diet, no other food of any kind being given. In all cases, the diet should be regulated, and milk should form a principal part of it. Sugar is bad for the disease, and all rich food. Meat should be taken sparingly; green vegetables are good.

Medicines. – (Two or three times a day.)

Rhus 3. – Acute eczema. (Rhus is apt to aggravate the disease before curing it; if this should occur, wait until the action of the first dose has ceased before repeating it. If after the aggravation has passed improvement sets in, do not repeat the dose until the improvement ceases.)

Sulph. 6. –

Irritation coming on when warm in bed at night.

Arsen. 3

– Much redness of the skin, the patient is irritable and anxious.

Graphites 6

– When there is glutinous exudation.

Mercurius6.

– Weeping eczema; in the bend of elbows and knees.

Hepar 6.

– After Mercurius, in pustular cases; sensitive subjects who must be covered up and kept warm; rash worse in cold wind.

About the author

John Henry Clarke

John Henry Clarke

John Henry Clarke MD (1853 – November 24, 1931 was a prominent English classical homeopath. Dr. Clarke was a busy practitioner. As a physician he not only had his own clinic in Piccadilly, London, but he also was a consultant at the London Homeopathic Hospital and researched into new remedies — nosodes. For many years, he was the editor of The Homeopathic World. He wrote many books, his best known were Dictionary of Practical Materia Medica and Repertory of Materia Medica

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *