No-7

Last modified on January 12th, 2019

No-7

BACILLUS No. “7” (Paterson)

This is so named because it was the 7th non-lactose fermenting type of bacillus to be observed in the laboratory, and as it did not conform to any of the previously known groups, it was given the numeral “7”.

As a key note for the use of this nosode I suggest “Mental and, Physical, Fatigue”. The “proving” of Bacillus No. “7” is not unlike that of Proteus (Bach) as it has similar relationship; Proteus (Bach) is related to Chlorine whereas Bacillus No. “7” seems to have a closer relationship to the two halogens, Bromine and Iodine, often in combination with Potassium.

Mentals. The outstanding symptoms is mental fatigue, a feeling of unfitness for any mental effort, which produces a sense of extreme physical exhaustion.

Digestive System. All the symptoms can be related to general lack of nerve and muscle tone; a sense of fullness after food; flatulence and distention of the stomach, enteroptosis.

Genito-urinary System. Feeble urinary flow; loss of sexual function; premature senility.

Respiratory System. Asthma; bronchial catarrh; tough sticky mucus, difficult to raise.

(Compare the symptom picture of Kali carb., which is one or the associated remedies.)

Circulation. Slow pulse rate, often with lowered blood pressure; myocardial weakness.

(Potassium has specific action on cardiac muscle).

Neuro-muscular System. Relaxed fibrous tissue, with tendency to the formation of “rheumatic nodules”; headache, cannot stand long without feeling of faintness; tendency to syncope after sudden exertion.

Skin. Nothing, outstanding; sensitive to cold, to draughts and cold damp air.

About the author

John Paterson

John Paterson 1890 – 1954 was an orthodox physician who converted to homeopathy. John Paterson was a Microbiologist, who was married to Elizabeth Paterson, also a Microbiologist. They both worked at the Glasgow Homeopathic Hospital and at the Royal London Homeopathic Hospital.
John Paterson was President of International Homeopathic Medical League in 1939.
John Paterson wrote The Bowel Nosodes, and he was responsible for introducing them into British homeopathy n the 1920s.

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