Veterinary Homeopathy

Ask The Holistic Vet – February 2022

Deva Khalsa
Written by Deva Khalsa

Holistic / Homeopathic veterinarian Dr. Deval Khalsa answers readers’ questions each month. This month readers asked about sarcoid on a horse, FIP, Coronavirus in a cat, eosinophilic granuloma and more.

Dear Dr. Deva,

I have a 3-year-old Great Pyrenees, Pire, who has eaten pebbles, up to 1″, since he arrived three years ago. It hasn’t seemed to have affected him, but a guest just warned me that he should have an echo of his stomach immediately. I am a homeopath of over 30 years myself, and might think of Calcarea carbonica. I’ve had many dogs before, but none with this problem. How dangerous is it and how should I diagnose and treat him? We live half-time in Chile (there now) and would have to drive 3 hours for a really good veterinary diagnosis. I am really worried about him.

Thank you!

Dr. Judyth Reichenberg-Ullman

Dr. Deva Khalsa,

The first question is if you can find and see the pebbles in his stool. At his size, he should be able to pass these 1 inch pebbles through his GI tract. An obstruction would have obvious indicators such as an inability to pass feces. That said, he could be harboring these stones in his stomach. Sometimes a dog can eat a squeaker from a toy or something like that and it will roll around in his stomach for weeks or months before it causes a problem. 

Sometimes it rolls around and is finally passed in the stool. Dogs commonly eat stones.  Dogs also commonly swallow huge chunks of bones. Most of this stuff passes.  I cannot get my Labrador Retriever plush toys with legs and arms as he will chew off the 5 inch leg and I will see this colored stuff in his stool and there it is!!! It is amazing what a dog can pass. So one inch stones for a dog this size should be able to be passed. That said, who knows for sure.

As far as eating them. Some dogs love to eat mulch for who knows why. He may enjoy doing this. We don’t know if it is a dietary mineral imbalance or a habit.  If he is eating and passing stool with no vomiting or problems and he has been doing this for 3 years (or longer) I would not worry. I am hesitant to say this without an exam as veterinarians need to be very careful.

But all that I have said above is true and all veterinarians have experienced dogs eating ‘stuff’.  Usually no problem. I had one patient that ate panty hose and we had to surgically remove it every time he did. (Different from a squeaker in a toy) You would think the owner would have kept the panty hose off the floor after episode One!

I would worm him. Worms are insidious and can cause strange cravings. Panacur or a similar product containing fenbendazole is often available over the counter.  One dose a day per weight for 3 days. If he has ever had fleas he then has tapeworms.  For this you need Droncit and this is a script from a vet. You need two doses 10 days apart to make sure the tapeworms are killed.

As far as a remedy.  It is a crapshoot. You can’t go wrong with Calc Carb if he fits the picture for his breed. A few doses are always good in general. But will it fix this? Unknown 


Dear Dr Khalsa,

A client’s warmblood cross filly has developed what appears to be a warty type sarcoid on her chest. We have been applying frankincense essential oil to the sarcoid twice daily for just under a month. The sarcoid is now less raised, but I’m hoping there may be a homeopathic remedy which can help clear it up? The filly is otherwise healthy, consumes a terrific diet and is happy and placid.

Thank you and Kind Regards,

Camilla Whishaw  [email protected]

Dr. Deva Khalsa:

Arsenicum album is THE equine remedy. It is used so very often in equines and it fits many horses. So it may help to increase the vital force at 200c once every other day. You are saying it ‘appears to be a warty sarcoid” Sarcoids can be serious. As I am not an equine veterinarian, I suggest you have it examined by a competent local equine veterinarian.


Hi Dr. Khalsa,

I am going crazy, 8-year-old dog keeps vomiting yellow bile in the morning! I feed raw diet and I already took him to the vet and they say nothing is wrong with him! I give him food before bed thinking he is hungry that is why he vomits, yet he still vomits. Also, the treats I give him are homemade, no store bought treats! Any suggestions what to do?

Thank you

Gerty

Dr. Deva Khalsa:

Worms can cause a upset in the digestive tract. A fecal test is 70% false negative, so it is a good idea to just routinely worm your dog. I like Panacure which has the active ingredient fenbendazole and you can get it over the counter at 1-800 pet meds (it’s hard to get because everybody’s buying it to cure their own cancer).

There’s also something called safeguard which also has fenbendazole as the ingredient. 1-800 pet meds is the only place that has fenbendazole over the counter. Now, if your dog also ever had fleas there could also be tape worms there and that requires a different wormer which is called Droncit. It has to be scripted. 

As far as remedies I would give Nux vomica 6x twice in the evening before bed and also give one dose of Chelidonium 30 X first thing in the morning.  Follow this protocol for a month. And if it works, we’re good.


Hello Dr. Khalsa,

My cat was diagnosed with a mycoplasma infection. He tested positive for it on an upper respiratory panel. He’s on doxycycline but I’m wondering if there’s something safer I could use.

Thank you

Lydia

Dr. Deva Khalsa:

There is a disease called feline mycoplasma anemia which actually kills them. It makes them more and more anemic because these tiny micro plasm’s which are like little jellyfish the same size of a virus attaches to the outside of the red blood cells. The body does not recognize his red blood cells so it destroys them. It is a deadly disease and very serious. Respectfully,  I am very grateful for the presence of doxycycline in today’s world because it handles mycoplasms beautifully. 

If this was my case, I would’ve started him on doxycycline and kept him on doxycycline for a good month. It’s a very safe antibiotic and it’s very effective and that’s what’s important.  Never throw out the baby with the bathwater.

There were times when antibiotics are a gift, because without them you’d never make it. You see there’s something on his red blood cell that his body says ‘this ain’t my red blood cell’ and there’s no remedy that’s going to change that because it’s a mechanical problem that’s recognized by a functioning immune system


Greetings Dr. Khalsa,

My ragdoll kitten, who has a slew of health issues, just had a PCR diarrhea panel done and it came back positive for coronavirus. This poor kitten has had chronic upper respiratory issues, GI issues, eye infections… and now this. What do I do, and how long do I need to keep her separate from my other cats.

Thanks very much

Brenda

Dr. Deva Khalsa

There are many studies out there and they all state that cats get these problems because they’re thymus isn’t working. The thymus is a very important gland in the cat and cats get viral infections, but they don’t get them when they’re thymus is working. So what I do is use a stem cell activating product to activate their thymus and it works fantastically. Go onto my consumer reports  https://certifiedconsumerreviews.com/dr-deva-khalsa/

and you can see several cases of cats that had enigmatic high fevers or chronic viral infections that are totally fine for the rest of their life because we actually boosted their thymus with a stem cell activated product. 

This is Dr. script only. As I am the VMD who began to initiate using this human product with animals, I suggest you make an appointment with me and I can explain to you how it works and what we do. This stem cell activating product does the job quickly and effortlessly whereas you can go out and buy all kinds of things like colostrum and mushrooms and go on and on and they’re never going to hit the nail on the head and get you where you want to go.


Hello Dr. Khalsa,

My 4- year-old cat was recently diagnosed with eosinophilic granuloma. They want to put her on steroids but I wanted to first see if there’s a better way.  Do I have options here?

Thank you

Bethany

Dr. Deva Khalsa: 

An eosinophilic granuloma is also called a rodent ulcer, and it is due to an allergy to food. You can put her on a very specific diet like something with duck or rabbit or you can make her not allergic anymore using a technique that I developed called Allergy Elimination 4 Pets and you can check it out at this site: www.allergyelimination4pets.com


Dear Dr. Khalsa,

Many years ago, I lost three cats to FIP.   I have a one-year-old cat now and she is perfectly healthy, but those memories are still strong.  There were no treatments back then. Is there anything currently available to prevent or treat it?

Thank you

Bonnie

Dr. Deva Khalsa:

I spoke about this in my answer to Brenda’s question (above).  The answer is  to keep the cat’s thymus gland in good shape and the immune system in good working order. Cats get viral infections, but they don’t get them when they’re thymus is working. What I do is use a stem cell activating product to activate their thymus and it works fantastically.  To learn more, go to my consumer reports  https://certifiedconsumerreviews.com/dr-deva-khalsa/   In all simplicity, this is what is needed to prevent FIP.


Dr. Khalsa,

My 12-year-old male cat was just diagnosed with severe arthritis in his elbow and knee. Vet says he may never walk with a normal gait again. All I want is for him to be comfortable. He was prescribed gabapentin but I’d rather go the holistic route. Are there alternatives I could try?

Thank you,

Brookellyn

Dr. Deva Khalsa:

I had the same thing with my older cat who was about 17. He had had chronic arthritis for many years.  I had used remedies and all kinds of things with him and things were just degenerating as he was getting older. 

One successful option is double helix water and that’s placed in the drinking water for him.  You can contact the company and talk to them. I ordered an odd thing which was a can called a Tesla BioHealing.  The animal version cost $399 and the human version cost $599 so I got the human version because I wanted to do the best I could for him and the energy is absorbed into the body. Within one day, 48 hours at most, he was walking normally.

Now, he gets nothing for his arthritis, yet he jumps off the bed, saunters around and I haven’t seen him walk as well for about 10 years. He’s getting no oral homeopathic, natural or any other medication. I’ve had several people buy these cans since I just bought it right after Christmas and many of them say their cats are moving a lot better, but I don’t have a ton of patient reports.


Dear Dr. Deva,

I have a 3-year-old Great Pyrenees, Pire, who has eaten pebbles, up to 1″, since he arrived three years ago. It hasn’t seemed to have affected him, but a guest just warned me that he should have an echo of his stomach immediately. I am a homeopath of over 30 years myself, and might think of Calcarea carbonica. I’ve had many dogs before, but none with this problem. How dangerous is it and how should I diagnose and treat him? We live half-time in Chile (there now) and would have to drive 3 hours for a really good veterinary diagnosis. I am really worried about him.

Thank you!

Dr. Judyth Reichenberg-Ullman

Dr. Deva Khalsa:

The first question is if you can find and see the pebbles in his stool. At his size, he should be able to pass these 1 inch pebbles through his GI tract. An obstruction would have obvious indicators such as an inability to pass feces. That said, he could be harboring these stones in his stomach. Sometimes a dog can eat a squeaker from a toy or something like that and it will roll around in his stomach for weeks or months before it causes a problem. 

Sometimes it rolls around and is finally passed in the stool. Dogs commonly eat stones.  Dogs also commonly swallow huge chunks of bones. Most of this stuff passes.  I cannot get my Labrador Retriever plush toys with legs and arms as he will chew off the 5 inch leg and I will see this colored stuff in his stool and there it is!!! It is amazing what a dog can pass. So one inch stones for a dog this size should be able to be passed. That said, who knows for sure.

As far as eating them. Some dogs love to eat mulch for who knows why. He may enjoy doing this. We don’t know if it is a dietary mineral imbalance or a habit.  If he is eating and passing stool with no vomiting or problems and he has been doing this for 3 years (or longer) I would not worry. I am hesitant to say this without an exam as veterinarians need to be very careful.

But all that I have said above is true and all veterinarians have experienced dogs eating ‘stuff’.  Usually no problem. I had one patient that ate panty hose and we had to surgically remove it every time he did. (Different from a squeaker in a toy) You would think the owner would have kept the panty hose off the floor after episode One!

I would worm him. Worms are insidious and can cause strange cravings. Panacur or a similar product containing fenbendazole is often available over the counter.  One dose a day per weight for 3 days. If he has ever had fleas he then has tapeworms.  For this you need Droncit and this is a script from a vet. You need two doses 10 days apart to make sure the tapeworms are killed.

As far as a remedy.  It is a crapshoot. You can’t go wrong with Calc Carb if he fits the picture for his breed. A few doses are always good in general. But will it fix this? Unknown 

Visit Dr. Khalsa at her website for information and consults (including phone consults):   http://www.doctordeva.com/

Editor’s note: Dr. Khalsa’s new book was just released:

The Allergic Pet –Holistic Solutions to End the Allergy Epidemic in Our Dogs and Cats

Dr. Khalsa shows how to strengthen the immune systems of dogs and cats without invasive techniques or pharmaceutical drugs.

https://www.amazon.com/Allergic-Pet-Holistic-Solutions-Epidemic/dp/1621871827

also…. The second edition of Dr. Khalsa’s Natural Dog is now available. It’s an exceptional book with information not offered in any similar work. I recommend it highly!

About the author

Deva Khalsa

Deva Khalsa

Dr. Deva Khalsa V.M.D. is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, a Fellow and Professor of the British Institute of Homeopathy and has lectured both nationally and internationally. She is the co-author of ‘Healing Your Horse: Alternative Therapies’ and Dr. Khalsa’s Natural Dog‘. Her practice includes homeopathy acupuncture, Chinese Herbs, nutrition, N.A.E.T, J.M.T. and other modalities. Her philosophy is to use whatever it takes to restore health. Dr. Khalsa’s practice is in New Zealand but she consults by internet and phone with pet owners from the US, Canada, Australia, South Africa, New Zealand, Europe and the UK. http://www.doctordeva.com

4 Comments

  • Hi Dr Khalsa,

    Have you had any experience / success treating separation anxiety in dogs with Homoeopathy, please. I am a qualified Homoeopath for twenty years and recently graduated in Animal Homoeopathy.

    Our nearly two years mini schnauzer howls when my husband leaves the house. Even though I am at home and so our other mini schnauzer.

  • Hi Dr khalsa, I need urgent help for my 8 year old lab suffering from tick fever and ckd. Please guide. His condition is deteriorating. Thank you so much in advance. Blessing from India

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