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Feline Infectious Peritonitis (FIP)



Hpathy Ezine, May, 2008 | Print This Post Print This Post |

My work with FIP “terminal cases” (which is when they are diagnosed) started relatively recently, my first success being in early 2003. I’ll present the principles I use which I developed in my work with this illness, but first here’s a little background, to explain the situation to those not already “in the know” about what FIP is really about, as understanding the disease is key to repertorizing a matching remedy. I hope too that what I learned may be useful to others not only in handling FIP but with other comparable disease situations. BACKGROUND According to the Journal of Veterinary Medicine 2007 Nov-Dec issue, “There is no therapy with proven efficacy to treat cats with feline infectious peritonitis (FIP).” In this issue, page 1193,  a German study presented is the latest (failed) attempt to repeat the only known claimed success, in Japan in late 2003, when four older cats in a group of 12 cats with FIP, were said to have survived the disease by use of prednisone and interferon. The Japanese study was not formal, had no controls or protocols and follow-up was indirect; the four survivor cats were not seen but owners claimed they were still alive. The German study had 37 cats from various owners in a placebo controlled double-blind trial, but not one FIP-infected cat (treated or control) survived more than 2 months after diagnosis, whether using prednisone, interferon or a combination. Hence the disease is still considered universally fatal to cats. The standard procedure […]

My work with FIP “terminal cases” (which is when they are diagnosed) started relatively recently, my first success being in early 2003. I’ll present the principles I use which I developed in my work with this illness, but first here’s a little background, to explain the situation to those not already “in the know” about what FIP is really about, as understanding the disease is key to repertorizing a matching remedy. I hope too that what I learned may be useful to others not only in handling FIP but with other comparable disease situations.

BACKGROUND

According to the Journal of Veterinary Medicine 2007 Nov-Dec issue, “There is no therapy with proven efficacy to treat cats with feline infectious peritonitis (FIP).” In this issue, page 1193,  a German study presented is the latest (failed) attempt to repeat the only known claimed success, in Japan in late 2003, when four older cats in a group of 12 cats with FIP, were said to have survived the disease by use of prednisone and interferon.

The Japanese study was not formal, had no controls or protocols and follow-up was indirect; the four survivor cats were not seen but owners claimed they were still alive. The German study had 37 cats from various owners in a placebo controlled double-blind trial, but not one FIP-infected cat (treated or control) survived more than 2 months after diagnosis, whether using prednisone, interferon or a combination. Hence the disease is still considered universally fatal to cats. The standard procedure for a veterinarian diagnosing FIP, is to suppress the immune system with high dose steroid (prednisone) and to give antibiotics “to control secondary infection”, but even though this is a chronic disease, death can occur in just days, especially with the most common effusive form of FIP in kittens, called simply “wet FIP”.

It will help to briefly outline what this illness is about, as the name is a misnomer and understanding it is essential to appropriate homeopathy. Then I’ll discuss what experience has taught me with more than 400 cases since Jan 2003. Included are before and after photos to illustrate progress. It is my hope to encourage other homeopaths not to give up on cats with this illness even though, currently, successes are very hard-won.

Feline Infectious Peritonitis comes in three forms, none infectious, and none peritonitis, and none of this is well understood by the majority of vets either! The misnomer name harks from before 1998 when the true nature of the disease first became known. They got the “Feline” part right – and thankfully this horrid illness does not occur in any other species currently.

FIP is a unique disease in that it is triggered when a commonly present gut corona virus in cats (FeCoV for “feline corona virus”) is forced by external stresses in the presence of an imbalanced immune system, to undergo mutation to a much more dangerous virus (FIPV for “feline infectious peritonitis virus”), which in turn tricks the immune system into attacking and killing the cat, this way:

* the cat’s macrophages, which should normally engulf and overcome any virus invader, are instead used as incubators for virus replication – and

* the antibodies produced that should normally be used against the virus, are instead used to attack and destroy the cat.

That’s the disease in a nut shell, it is a chronic disease by its autoimmune type but can kill very much faster than most autoimmune diseases. It also presents with a huge variety of symptoms and thus deserves deeper understanding to help with remedy selection issues, and with nutrition issues – both equally important in FIP handling as well as FIP prevention.

So I’ll expand on that brief definition with suggestions on prevention or management of illness at each step. I am concentrating here on “wet FIP” as this is the trickiest to deal with, and the fastest killer of the three types.

VIRUS INVOLVEMENT IN FIP:

The commonly present gut virus which is involved in supplying material to mutate into the FIP virus (FIPV) in cats, is a feline enteric corona virus (FeCoV) found in almost all cats. FeCoV usually is not a health problem, though if present in high enough numbers in the gut, it can cause gastroenteritis symptoms and can become a potential stress factor for the cat. This virus can be transmitted from cat to cat, but since it is ubiquitous anyway, that is not an issue contrary to common allopathic belief.

However – if you add enough stress factors, you will see mutation of FeCoV to the FIP virus and that is an altogether different issue to deal with, though the FIP virus is not transmitted cat to cat – each cat has to mutate their own FIP virus to get the disease, and that requires many factors to be present. It’s relevant here as FIP is easy to prevent and it behooves the homeopath to make sure anyone presenting a cat with FIP at least knows how to prevent this devastating disease.

Food to control the FeCoV stress:

FeCoV spreads between cats and kittens via litter, grooming, contact, etc., so is quite ubiquitous. In groups of cats where it is symptomatic at all, it can be readily brought under control with diet. In addition to a 34% or more animal protein diet, cats need a colony of appropriate bifidus gut bacteria (not acidophilus) to make for them what we humans get from fruit and vegetables (which cats cannot digest and should not be fed). The bifidus in turn, need up to a teaspoon a day each of pure rice bran and plain cooked pumpkin as fuel, and no herbs or preservatives to kill the bacteria, and they will then ensure the high protein diet is used to make butyrate, acetate and propionate for a healthy gut that supports healthy organs. The bifidus will also out-compete any excess of FeCoV present. This good nutritional base controls FeCoV and improves general health but does not help the potential for FIP mutation triggered by other factors. FeCoV can be induced to mutate into the FIP virus even when present in very small quantities. It only takes one. Hence prevention of FIP requires a balanced immune system in addition to appropriate nutrition.

Prevention of Feline Infectious Peritonitis

External Stresses damage the immune system, a prerequisite to FIP. I’ve put prevention up front as it helps with understanding of the disease and hence with management of it, as one must remove maintaining causes.

Irene de Villiers

Irene de Villiers

Comments

  1. Ros Nelson

    February 20, 2015

    RE- Cats infected with FIP (previous post) Please help -urgent situation! My e-mail is nelsons006@hawaii.rr.com and tel number 808-887-1366

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