Passive Case Witnessing Problem

It’s a case of a 6 year old girl who consulted me on 18/12/08.

The very first peculiar thing we observe about the child is …she enters the consulting room holding mothers hand tightly.

M: She has made a drawing for you.

(Child’s sibling is also our patient. Every time when this child used to accompany her sister, she would draw and now also she has got the following drawings. This itself shows us the child’s intense connection with her subconscious through this form of art.)

M: She does not have any health problem as such but I wanted to start treatment for her overall development.

PASSIVE CASE WITNESSING PROCESS

D:        Tell me what’s happening to you..? Can I send your mother out?

P: No.

OBSERVATION: Clings tightly to her mother.

D:        Okay, tell me what’s your name?

P: OBSERVATION: Sitting in mothers lap with her hands around mother’s neck. N……P……

D:        Tell me more about you?

P: PAUSE

OBSERVATION: Smiles and clings more to the mother.

D:        Tell me what are your interest and hobbies? What you like to do?

P: I like to swim, like to draw, I like running…playing.

D:        Wow! What else?

P: I like to play on the computer, like to watch TV.

OBSERVATION: Now she removes her hand from the mother’s neck and sits leaning on the table, yet she is in her mothers lap.

D:        What else you like to do?

P: Like to go to school.

D:        Very nice, very nice you are talking?

M: You sit on the chair and talk to the doctor.

P: OBSERVATION; child sits on a chair next to the mother but still holding her arm.

As the mother starts to leave the room, the child jumps off the chair, starts crying and goes and hugs the mother, and goes out with her.)

(The mother comes in with her after some time but now the child sits on the chair and mother on the sofa behind her.)

D:        OK, so tell me what else you like to do?

P: I’ll like to play – go on a slide. Like to read books.

D:        Very nice. You are speaking so well. What else you like to do?

P: Like to dance… then I like to play, then I do homework.

OBSERVATION: Looks behind towards the  mother.

ACTIVE CASE WITNESSING PROCESS

D:        And what are you scared of?

P: Scared of lions, tigers…

D:        What else?

P: Bhoot.

The mother had some work and she had to go out of the room. Immediately the child said no.

D:        You are speaking so well. Just talk with me and your mother will come in 2 minutes.

P: No…no…(OBSERVATION: She gets up and clings to mother and starts crying)

D:        OK you don’t talk, but can you draw till your mom comes back?

(She sits on the chair and starts drawing.)

(Since she was not ready to communicate even after so much of encouragement and the fact that at the beginning she had brought drawings, we ask her to draw.)

OBSERVATION: She covers the paper with the hand and also draws at one lower section of the page.)

D:        Wow! What is this?

P: This is my sister & me, & this is my father and my brother.

D:        And what is this?

P: A heart.

ACTIVE – ACTIVE CASE WITNESSING PROCESS…

D:        What is this heart doing here?

P: I love heart so I drew it.

D:        Earlier also you drew hearts. What about this heart you love?

P: I love heart like that only.

D:        Heart with arrows what does this mean?

P: Looking into the drawing. (PAUSE)

D:        What are you all doing?

P: We all are looking at the heart and thinking what is it.

D:        What does the heart mean?

P: I don’t know.

D:        You like drawing heart huh. When do you draw it?

P: In school. In my drawing class. I draw heart and stars and one day I drew heart and star in the Christmas tree.

D:        In this drawing who is having the flower? (We spotted a flower in the drawing she had made.)

P: My sister- she is just holding it.

D:        She is going to give it to someone or what?

P: Me.

D:        And heart will go to whom.

P: To my brother and father.

D:        Why?

P: Like that only.

D:        Like that only. OK… Would you like to draw something more for me?

D:        Wow! What is this?

P: A drawing.

D:        Of what?

P: Drawing of a garden. This is me and my brother.

D:        What are you both doing here?

P: We have come here to play.

D:        What are you playing?

P: Running and catching.

D:        What is this?

P: Flowers.

D:        Which flower are they?

P: This is flower, this rose and…this …this is pink flower.

D:        Draw one more thing for me?

P: OBSERVATION:  She draws human figures and then joins all of them together.

D:        Wow! What is this? I don’t know what it is.

P: My family.

D:        What’s your family doing here?

P: Ring-a-ring-a-roses.

D:        Ring-a-ring-a-roses. What’s that?

P: I don’t know.

D:        Whom you like the most in your family?

P: My mom.

D:        What about mom you like the most.

P: (PAUSE)

D:        You like or your sister likes?

P: I like more.

D:        What else?

P: (PAUSE)

ACTIVE – ACTIVE IN DIFFERENT AREA – FEAR

D:        What are you scared the most.

P: Lion and tiger.

D:        What about them scares you the most?

P: Because lion crawls and eat us.

D:        What else do they do.

P: Smiles.

D:        You said previously that you are also scared of ghost. What about them scares you?

P: (PAUSE) … I saw the movie called Road side Romeo. (This is a bollywood movie)

(Here when we ask her about fears, she herself goes to the area of movies, so we become active- active to explore this area.)

ACTIVE – ACTIVE IN DIFFERENT AREA -MOVIES

D:        What is there in that movie?

P: There’s a dog, many dogs but 1 dog’s name is Romeo.

D:        Go on?

P: There is a girl called Leila and she loved…. and that dog he loved Leila..

D:        I don’t know what they do? Love means what?

P: I don’t know.

D:        What about the movie do you like the most?

P: I like Leila.

D:        What about Leila you like?

P: (PAUSE)

OBSERVATION: leans on the table and hides mouth behind both palms.

D:        Which other movies you like?

P: Romeo & Jaane tu… (It’s a Bollywood romantic movie.)

D:        And what is there in that movie Jaane tu…?

P: I forget.

D:        Anything else about you.

P: Nods no.

D:        So you like all movies with love/

P: Nods Yes.

D:        What about it you like?

P: I don’t know… because nice things happen.

D:        What?

P: Like they don’t shout, they don’t hit and all.

D:        Anything else.

P: No.

Child goes out and comes back with another drawing along with the mother.

MOTHER’S OBSERVATION OF THE CHILD

She is very affectionate child.  She will go and give big hugs even to strangers. She is very fond of her younger brother and she will make him understand things by saying you can win this or that and she lets him win. Actually she is friendly with anybody and everybody.

END OF THE CASE

—————————————————

UNDERSTANDING OF THE CASE

OU OF PLACE/ OUT OF ORDER

Passive case witnessing process

Verbally the child didn’t speak anything peculiar but our observations regarding the child were very peculiar…

• Her clinging.
• Sitting in the mother’s lap.
• Holding mother tightly.
• Holding her hand while talking.
• Hugging the mother.

Active case witnessing process

• Clings to mother as she tries to go out of the room.
• Covering the paper with hand while drawing.
• A heart.

Active-Active case witnessing process

• I love heart .
• I drew heart and star in the Christmas tree.
• Drawing of a garden
• Flowers.
• Draws human figures and then joins all of them together.
• Too much family attachment.
• Ring-a-ring-a-roses.
• That dog he loved Laila Leila
• Like they don’t shout, they don’t hit and all.

WHAT IS THE FOCUS/CENTRE/ESSENCE OF THE CASE

• Love, attachment and togetherness.
• Love for heart.

This is very evident from her body language and all her drawings. Also this further gets confirmed from the mother’s observation of the child.

WHICH KINGDOM?

• Pure sensitivity seen.
• Drawings of garden, flowers.

This clearly points to the PLANT KINGDOM.

WHICH FAMILY?

This tremendous attachment to the mother, togetherness of the family, hugging and clinginess, love for hearts is very suggestive of the MALVALES family.

WHICH MIASM?

We observed that whenever she draws she covers the paper with her hand. This gives a hint of the SYCOTIC MIASM.

WHICH REMEDY?

The remedy from the Malvales family with Sycotic miasm running in the centre is TILIA EUROPA. BUT in the case we observed that along with the general theme of the Malvales family, the child’s focus was “Heart”. So when a further inquisitive search was made keeping focus on the “Heart” interestingly we found out a remedy TILIA CORDATA which also belongs to the same family where the leaves of the tree are heart shaped.
Thus the remedy given was TILIA CORDATA.

WHICH POTENCY?

At the end of Passive case witnessing process, verbally the child seemed to be at the ‘Name and Fact’ level but the peculiar body language which we didn’t understand initially and which got connected later on with the whole phenomenon, represented the child’s complete altered energy pattern. Thus the child (non-verbally) vibrated at the Delusion level. Therefore the potency given was 1M, single dose.

A follow up drawing

END OF THE CASE

Juglans nigra



Hpathy Ezine, December, 2008 | Print This Post |

Juglans nigra

Source: vegetable

Clinical: Rows of Black Walnut interplanted with corn in an alley cropping system reduced corn yield. This was attributed to production of juglone, an allelopathic compound from Black Walnut, found 4.25 meters from the trees.
Juglone is important in that it can be used to prepare the soil in advance of planting or seeding a crop. Juglone will be absorbed by the weed seeds, prohibiting their germination. The remedy is neutralised by UV light 48 hours later and one can then plant or seed the crop.

General:

Walnut is the common name given to twenty species of deciduous trees in the genus Juglans, of which six species are native to the United States. The black walnut, Juglans nigra, which is native to Virginia, grows from Maine west to southern Michigan and south to Texas and Georgia.

Black Walnut is the tallest of the walnuts, with the potential to reach 100 feet. The compound leaves of walnuts are spaced alternately along the branches. Each leaf is divided into an odd number—usually from 7 to 23—of small yellowish green leaflets. Walnuts are monoecious, with male flowers borne in long, unbranched, drooping catkins and female flowers borne singly or in short spikes. The walnut fruit is a nut, borne singly or in pairs, and enclosed in a solid, non-splitting green husk. The edible, oil-rich nut kernal is enclosed in a thick, hard, ridged, black shell. Black walnut heartwood is heavy, hard, strong, and durable, with a chocolate brown color prized by furniture manufacturers and many other industries.

Though grown primarily for its wood and nuts, black walnuts are often found growing on landscape sites where they serve primarily as shade trees. When certain other landscape plants are planted near or under this shade tree they tend to yellow, wilt, and die. This decline occurs because the walnut tree produces a non-toxic, colorless, chemical called hydrojuglone. Hydrojuglone is found in leaves, stems, fruit hulls, inner bark and roots. When exposed to air or soil compounds, hydrojuglone is oxidized into the allelochemical juglone, which is highly toxic.

Several related trees such as English walnut, hickories and pecan also produce juglone, but in smaller amounts compared to black walnut. Juglone is one of many plant produced chemicals that can harm other plants in a process known as allelopathy. (Additional common landscape trees with allelopathic properties: sugar maple, tree-of-heaven, hackberries, southern waxmyrtle, American sycamore, cottonwood, black cherry, red oak, black locust, sassafrass, and American elm.)

Juglone in the soil

Juglone is exuded from all parts of the walnut tree. Juglone can affect other plants either through root contact, leakage or decay in the soil, falling and decaying leaves, or when rain leaches and drips juglone from leaves and branches onto plants below. Plants located beneath the canopy of walnut trees are most at risk because juglone from the roots and fallen leaves accumulates there.

Although juglone has low water solubility and does not move far in the soil, small amounts may be injurious to sensitive plants. Plant roots can encounter juglone when they grow within 0.5 – 0.25 inches from a walnut root.
Walnut roots can extend in the soil well beyond the crown or drip line of the tree, affecting susceptible plants far from the black walnut. The accumulation and depletion of toxins in the soil is affected by factors such as soil type, drainage, aeration, temperature and microbial action. Soil microorganisms ingest allelochemicals as energy sources, and metabolic decomposition can render the chemicals non-toxic to plants. When soils are well drained and aerated, a healthy population of aerobic microorganisms can accelerate this process.

Wet, poorly aerated soil, very common in many urban areas, discourages microbial growth. Plants sensitive to the walnut tree’s toxic effect may be at a higher risk when planted in heavy urban soils that lack organic matter. Toxins adhere to organic matter rather than being absorbed by plants, and organic matter also encourages a healthy soil microbial population.

Mycorrhizal fungi are commonly associated with forest tree roots and are considered necessary for normal uptake functions. Allelochemicals can disrupt the uptake process by damaging the root hairs or by inhibiting mycorrhizal populations in the soil. These different soil factors all have an effect on the accumulation or depletion of juglone produced by the black walnut tree.

Juglone production from walnut tree

Volatilization from leaves
Leaching from leaves by rain, fog, or dew.
Released from decomposing leaves, fruits and twigs.
Exudation from roots. Released from decomposing sloughed roots.

In the eastern United States, one of the most common allelopathic species is Black Walnut, which produces the chemical Juglone. Considerable research has been done on this chemical because of the problems it causes in horticulture and agriculture.

There are some vegetables that are juglone tolerant. A list of them is given below. The list is provided by Karen Delahaut, IPM Specialist, UW-Madison.

Vegetables:

Allium
Beans
Carrots
Corn
Melons
Squash

Fruits:

Prunus species, Peach, Nectarine, Cherry, Plum
Pyrus species, Pear
Rubus occidentalis, Black Raspberry

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V.D. Kaviraj is a Dutch homeopath, author, researcher and pioneer in Agrohomeopathy. He has written textbooks on various aspects of homeopathy including “Homeopathy for Farm and Garden”.

V.D. Kaviraj

V.D. Kaviraj is a Dutch homeopath, author, researcher and pioneer in Agrohomeopathy. He is also Vice President, World Homoeopathic Association UK Chapter. He has written textbooks on various aspects of homeopathy including "Homeopathy for Farm and Garden", which is now available in seven languages. The revised and enlarged edition with 376 pages has just been published : http://www.narayana-publishers.com/Homeopathy-for-Farm-and-Garden/Vaikunthanath-Das-Kaviraj/b8241

Comments

  1. shima

    July 24, 2011

    Hi
    I am a graduate student in plant sciences in MA and for my thesis I investigated the allelopathy effects of walnut leaf extract on cumin, but the result of the most papers I have studied were reverse with my results, most of the times inhibitory effects but this time boosting?!, this result was surprised me, have you seen articles like this result? Please help me.

    sincerely:
    Nasseri

  2. shima

    July 24, 2011

    Hi
    i studied it and enjoyed alot perhaps it was a useful article and i will suggest it to others

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